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[–] fuzzysaucer 0 points 82 points (+82|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This is called porous/pervious concrete. It's a good idea, as long as you have naturally fast draining soil underneath (sand). Learn more here: http://www.perviouspavement.org/

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[–] 9-11 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago  (edited ago)

its also 2 or 3 times more expensive than a regular parking lot.

regular parking lots have 6 inchs of gravel, this porous one has 3 feet of gravel. do you know how much gravel costs? its the pricest thing in the equation and you just x6 that cost.

there is also geotextile which is also pricey and it takes twice as long for construction (double the wages to workers), its an expensive splurge when you could have just dug a pond for water runoff. you see these parking lots in best buys... walmarts... big box.... and the reason is so that they DONT have to put in a pond, where a pond could have been a footlocker or mattress store.

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[–] dregan 2 points 26 points (+28|-2) ago 

Give me concrete that snow will pass through and you can have 10 times the price of normal concrete from me.

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[–] Grospoliner 2 points 5 points (+7|-2) ago 

2 to 6.5 vs 3.25 to 5.25 USD/ sqft porous concrete to regular concrete. 20 to 40% more expensive depending on local prices and availability.

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[–] anustart2015 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Isn't sand a bad base for a road though? Isn't it too soft? Wont the water begin to wash it away and create dips at the edges of the lot?

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[–] umilmi81 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

Wow. I was so sure this was photoshop. The concrete doesn't even appear to be wet after the water drains through.

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[–] grlldcheese 5 points -1 points (+4|-5) ago 

Why is this halfway down!!

[–] [deleted] 1 points 11 points (+12|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] fricknmaniac 0 points 37 points (+37|-0) ago 

I have to think that would only work really far south, because the first time that it gets below freezing it would get destroyed.

Still awesome, though.

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[–] CowboyRob 0 points 25 points (+25|-0) ago 

That's begging for a sinkhole 'round these parts.

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[–] fuzzysaucer 4 points 4 points (+8|-4) ago 

By that logic, a sinkhole should form anywhere it rains... Sinkholes form from constant moving water (leaking pipe, underground stream) eroding the soil in a specific spot. Rain water naturally drains into the aquifer.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Broc_Lia 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

In Ireland we take potholes to a new level: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3mg4w9l3Kw

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[–] pitenius 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You can call pretty much anything a decenny. I once shit on a piece of toast and called it a "decenny supreme".

Decennies are a dime a dozen, but a decade only comes around every ten years.

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[–] umilmi81 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Michigan seems to follow the Belgium philosophy of road maintenance. Or maybe it's vice versa.

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[–] 9-11 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

by design it will never have any water close enough to the surface to freeze/fracture the porous asphalt because there is a 2-3 foot deep gravel bed underneath to drain into.

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[–] Grospoliner 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The concrete acts as a filter, allowing the water to pass through it. It does not retain water for precisely the reason you thought of. In actuality, previous pavements perform exceptionally well in cold climates. Have a look

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[–] weezkitty 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

Two things come to mind:

Where does the water go? Is the ground that absorbent underneath? And doesn't it seem a little strange for a cement truck to be pouring pure water?

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[–] o_V_o 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Filtercrete pervious concrete getting water dumped onto it by Concrete Mixer truck

Though you do have a point about the ground underneath it... seems like that could cause a sink hole or other similar problems.

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[–] DoctorShitlord_MD 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Sink holes are usually caused by running water underground that erodes the ground around the flow quickly. This is more of a seeping type of drainage into the layers of gravel and then into the soil beneath them.

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[–] 9-11 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

sink holes form as limestone is slowly dissolved by water, which could happen regardless of whether this was in your parking lot or not.

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[–] tpdplsio 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Some draining fill underneath that eventually gets collected by some drains probably.

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[–] 9-11 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

not usually, the rainwater is collected in a gravel bed underneath where it is allowed to seep into the natural soil, usually sand. otherwise it will go to one of those fenced in ponds.

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[–] DoctorShitlord_MD 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

There are layers of different sized gravel under the pressed asphalt, it won't just keep absorbing it indefinitely, a point gets reached where the ground below can't absorb it and the gravel buffer gets filled and at that point it will spill into the usual storm drains. But the idea is that not as much will spill over which will cut down on river pollution

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[–] GibsonRB5 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The water thing isn't weird. At the end of the shift its common to rinse out the hopper with a hose.

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[–] bdmthrfkr 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Won't sell well in California.

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[–] Grospoliner 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It absolutely will sell well in California. Previous concrete is a storm-water management device (expressly) to aid in the prevent of run-off. Those big ass culverts in LA are what they used to do with storm-water, collecting it and channeling it to some other location and dumping it there. Those culverts during rain events are usually pretty full. Previous surfaces help reduce that storm-water loading considerably (up to 80% possibility depending on terrain).

In fact there's already a million square feet of it in place as of 2006.

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[–] FeelinFroggy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Interesting. Can I take a look at this brochure and get back you before the end of the week? Things are kind of piling up, gotta take 'em one at a time and whatnot - but no, no, you did well, I liked the pitch, the product looks awesome - I'll totally be in touch with you.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] 2446865 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Ground water > water on the ground

Might refill some aquifers actually.

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[–] bdmthrfkr 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

Unfortunately you need water first.

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[–] DoctorShitlord_MD 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The new asphalt on the streets in my neighborhood is this type. It's supposed to prevent so much runoff into the storm drains and in doing so cut down on the pollution in the nearby rivers.

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[–] Umrtvovacz 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

How well does it work IRL?

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[–] Grospoliner 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

@DoctorShitlord_MD They work very well actually.

Incidentally, you are not trapping water within the previous pavement. The pavement acts as a filter which traps particulates larger than the water molecules, allowing the water to pass through it. Problems arise through improper maintenance of the pavements. They need to be vacuumed and when they are not, then water entrainment through the pavement fails to occur as designed. If the pavement actually held water, then during the first winter after installation the pavement would be destroyed by freeze expansion.

Depending on the terrain and run-off conditions, permeable pavements can be utilized to reduce storm-water run-off by 50-80% of the total runoff volume and pollutants by 60+% as the majority of pollutants are carried off by the first inch and a half or so of storm-water for any given rain event. They are not for every location however, as installing previous pavement in certain locations (such as below the water line or at the top of a hill) would reduce their efficiency.

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[–] DoctorShitlord_MD 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Not like that gif, that's for sure. Thing is that in the cities they've paved and repaved these streets over so many times that even if you rip out all of the asphalt and do this absorbent type of asphalt thing over it you're only going to trap so much water in it, it's not going to be a dump truck of water in a 1m square area

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[–] lorlipone 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

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[–] Robotrollcall- 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Johnny Rico doesn't give a shit about knowing more. Would you like to know more?

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[–] Kiwibomb 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Now if they could only find a way to make people's skulls out of a similar material so information could easily soak in.....

**edit: extra words and things

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[–] zippo 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I think that already works. What most people have a problem with is filtering out actual information from noise (bullshit).

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[–] Mead 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

sink hole creator

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