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[–] Arotaes_Forgehammer 14 points -9 points (+5|-14) ago  (edited ago)

Pff, that's not good enough. It shouldn't have happened in the first place.

E: Ignore me

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[–] Jasoman 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

Well then stop using Steam. I mean worse things have happened with less accountability. I rather Valve Program something then the Government the worst that got released was billing address and they will be contacted my Valve. If this was Target they would have just told the users to check there mailboxes carefully just in case your info was released or some shit like that.

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[–] Arotaes_Forgehammer 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

I wish I could switch. All my shit is on Steam, it's too valuable to up and abandon it.

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[–] ChillyHellion [S] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

On the one hand, I agree that it's a pretty big mistake for a company like Valve to have made, but on the other hand I completely appreciate them coming clean with the nature of what data was exposed and how the problem occurred. I didn't like that their initial statement referred to the data as "cached page information," because that's a pretty opaque way to refer to users' personal information, but they've done a much better job of informing users with the follow-up statement.

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[–] Jasoman 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Add they are not done and anyone who did have there billing address seen will be contacted.

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[–] pm-me-your-pm 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This kind of thing is often said by people who have no idea how software or software engineering works. Even in a mid-range software production, you're often dealing with literally tens of thousands of files, millions of lines of code, and the work of at least 5 - 10 engineers. On a scale as large as Steam, one can only speculate as to the complexity of the software involved. The result is that occasionally, unpredictable glitches occur and problems are caused.

Could Steam have been more diligent in testing the limits of their software? Sure. Does this mean that they somehow committed a grievous breach of trust by "allowing" this problem to occur? Not at all. In fact, we should be thankful to their brilliant engineers who were able to identify and solve the problem so quickly, as well as the foresight for account protection which made it so that even though other users could see some of your details, they could do literally nothing with the information.

If you'd like to see what happens when engineers don't respond properly to sudden issues or don't take adequate precautions to protect their software, I invite you to look at some of the recent major data breaches which have occurred in the last year alone.

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[–] ChillyHellion [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Could Steam have been more diligent in testing the limits of their software? Sure. Does this mean that they somehow committed a grievous breach of trust by "allowing" this problem to occur? Not at all. In fact, we should be thankful to their brilliant engineers who were able to identify and solve the problem so quickly,

I really think both attitudes are appropriate. While I didn't appreciate their opaque language in the initial statement, I'm impressed with how upfront and detailed they were with this announcement. However, I don't think Arotaes_Forgehammer is too far off base to say it shouldn't have happened. It was an avoidable mistake, and while I appreciate the complexity of the elements involved, I don't think it's unfair to ding them for the exposed data, because holding companies responsible for their screw-ups is what consumers do.

We hold companies responsible for their mistakes and their successes; this time Valve did a little of both, so both responses are reasonably justified.

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[–] tomlinas 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Should they have sent Phantom Squad a really nice Christmas card asking them to pretty please not DDoS them?

DDoS attacks can be mitigated but until they come at you you can't know the exact solution. When you have to plan and deploy something in the heat of the moment, it doesn't always go flawlessly. My only beef with Valve at this point is that their initially-released statement didn't explain why a configuration change was deployed on Christmas morning, so they left the door open to the idea that they were just incompetent at change management. This new statement is a lot more clear.

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[–] ChillyHellion [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I don't think people are upset about the downtime as much as the exposure of personal information, which it sounds like was an avoidable mistake caused by a caching partner. DDoS attacks can't really be mitigated, but personal information can always be reasonably secured. And I completely agree with you about opaque language in their initial statement; this one is much more upfront, and that's all I really wanted from them.