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[–] theangstofmen 0 points 29 points (+29|-0) ago 

There is always GOG(100% drm free), itch.io and a couple of other smaller shops to buy games from. GOG's catalog continues to grow.

You can also put steam into offline mode if you don't feel like popping online to play but that doesn't get rid of the drm or steam putting itself back into online mode automatically.

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[–] CaldwellMadison [S] 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

I'm just hearing about these other options now. I hope they last. Thanks!

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[–] theangstofmen 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

No problem. I think GOG will be around for awhile. It was stood up by CD Projekt Red (Witcher developer) and has/wants to do right by gamers.

Humble is another good place. They have what they call Humble Bundles that contain some sweeeet deals and are usually "pay what you want" type of deals.

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[–] Project2501 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Ever wondered why CDPR uses "CD Projekt" or "CD Projekt RED"? They had a history dealing with games back before they launched good old games/gog, and The Witcher series. They have lasted. You don't need to use their library software, galaxy, you just download the installer for a specific title, and go.

"they can data-mine me and log my gaming habits and who knows what else for marketing purposes. I bought a game I used to play 20 years ago (Blood by Monolith) from Steam and am forced to have an internet connection to play. That's gross."

Gee, it is almost as if I completely agree, and think gog is really one of your best bets.

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[–] uguu 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

friend of mine introduced me to gog the other day. i've heard their name before but always dismissed it since the same game was on steam and for a better price.

he showed me how gog games don't have drm so you can play it anywhere on any device without going online like how steam requires.

now i really regret how large my steam library is and wish i had bought those games on gog instead

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[–] theangstofmen 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

no one can dispute that steam has a larger and better library and some games that show up on gog show up well after they've been on steam for awhile. i usually try to buy from gog when I can but will go to steam when needed.

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[–] weezkitty 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

One thing about the GoG business model at first that turned me off is when they only sold old games and they sold 20+ year old games for exorbitant prices. Even if the original publisher otherwise didn't give much of a shit about them.

You could get the same games from abandonware sites for free (yes, I know they're technically illegal but again they are pre-2000 games and nobody cares)

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[–] theangstofmen 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I see what you mean but the prices were not that exorbitant when you consider that it was all completely legal. They were also able to procure some really old, kick ass, games. They were able to turn around and reinvest back into being able to secure some decent licenses. For them it worked out and a lot of the original games they brought in are much much cheaper now.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] CaldwellMadison [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Agreed. Fuck them. I thought I read too they also had lawsuits (I forget where) for not offering proper refunds to people who experienced bad downloads, or compatibility issues with their PCs.

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[–] hrdtak 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'd pay extra to buy it on Steam, as I personally enjoy the features. I have found myself repurchasing cheap games I already have on other platforms to put it into my Steam library.

  • In-Game overlay, can chat/browse the internet without needing to alt-tab.
  • Cloud saves so my saved games sync across multiple computers.
  • Cloud installs on demand, so I don't have to keep a library of games, I can install them on whichever PC I want whenever I want.
  • Automatic updates, no more trying to keep patches saved and having to check different web pages to get latest patches.
  • Integrated friend lists and multiplayer lobby. I can invite people into my game from my steam friend's list directly, even if they are out of the game.
  • Integrated voice comms (albeit they aren't that great, I use another service for that).
  • Integrated review system.
  • Stream your game from another PC (I can run a high requirements game on my gaming PC, and stream it to my $400 crap laptop while I am sitting in bed and it is very playable with almost no delay)
  • Stream your games online. (Your friend wants to see a quick demo of a game you just bought? Playing a tournament and they want to watch the playoff game? Twitch is obviously a better alternative if you are going to do this all the time, but with just a few clicks you can stream your game without having to install anything).
  • Achievements.
  • Store pops games for me that it thinks I will like based on games I've played. Some people might be creeped out by this, but I actually appreciate targeted advertisement in this regard, as it has shown me lots of little gems that I might not have seen otherwise.
  • Stats tracking. I find it interesting to look back and see how many hours I've spent on various games. It makes it easier to decide if a purchase was worth it.

I respect people's decision to not want the DRM, but I am personally online 99.9% of the time anyways. The few times I have been traveling I have just used offline mode which worked fine.

The added convenience to me outweighs any potential datamining risks. I don't mind my gaming habits data mined honestly, if it can be used to make better games or improve the gaming experience.

On the other hand I DO mind my browsing and social networks being data mined. (ISPs, Facebook, etc)

A final note, I remember PC gaming before Steam, and it had started to die. Piracy was so predominant on PC, that many developers just straight up stopped developing for it and did console stuff exclusively. I think the main advantage of Steam that has brought PC gaming back is more the added conveniences as just like with Netflix people do not mind paying for stuff as long as it is convenient to buy. Either way, I feel like Steam has been directly responsible for bringing PC gaming back to life and giving Indie games a much bigger platform to be profitable on.

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[–] CaldwellMadison [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is an insightful counter. Don't get me wrong, Steam still creeps me out but I appreciate the angle from a more dedicated gamer that benefits from the bells and whistles.

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[–] valk2 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

Game makers might like it because it prevents pirating

Do you know how they even pirate these games mate? When you copy the crack files over they are steam files. Steam makes games easier to crack most of the time. The lastest hurdle, which as been overcome was Denouveo or however you spell it. I know Rise of the Tomb Raider had it for sure.

I run games all the time while steam is offline. Never had an issue with it. I don't know why you are having issues with that.

You can also opt out of all of those data mining options. You can alternatively block them in the host file if your really paranoid. See here: Teach yourself how to block steam in your host file!

Steam has never been an issue for me. Sorry you haven't had the same experience.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] valk2 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Didn't know that, I play games that need patches all the time. I have had them waiting in my queue. Example: Car Mechanic Simulator 2018. This game has had 36 patches in 2 months. I've played the game without the patches because they have released broken ones in the past. Never have I come across what your describing. Not to say it isn't true, but it completely differs from my experiences.

Now you could always set Steam to not update games except for between a specific time. That will put the updates in your download queue. I have launched games recently, such as CMS 2018, without having them say I can't play it due to an update needed.

The only case I can see this being an issue are games that have their own client outside of steam, such as launchers for MMO's. Those update outside of steam most of time anyways. I could see you not being able to launch that because it needs an update.

I provided a way to prevent steam from downloading updates by altering your Host file.

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[–] valk2 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Here is a screenshot of what I was talking about, I can launch the game right now and it won't update.

https://imgoat.com/upload/success?id=46278

edit: Here a screenshot of when I launch the game: https://imgoat.com/upload/success?id=46279

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[–] CaldwellMadison [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

No, I'm pretty ignorant on the pirating stuff. It's good you can still run the games offline, but I still don't like all the extra hurdles or the fact it's a thing in the first place. Thanks for the input.

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[–] valk2 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Np, I hope you get things worked out.

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[–] RaiFighter 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

GOG really is the only way to go. Nice thing is, you just get an installer executable. First thing I always do after downloading it is burn that file onto a physical disc. Fuckin' beautiful.

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[–] rwbj 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago  (edited ago)

There is 0 problem using Steam offline. The reason game developers like Steam is because it provides countless benefits including:

  • All hosting and file management is taken care of
  • Clean updating/patching beta branches, and much more.
  • All financial stuff taken care of. This one is huge.
  • And of course the biggest reason of all - Steam has users in the 9 figures now. And they advertise your product, as appropriate, automatically and freely.
  • Maintenance free. Think about the fact you can go get a 20 year old game, on demand. That's awesome for the user and also awesome for the developer. The developer's going to have moved onto other things but instead of abandoning the product, users are able to get it on demand and developers are rewarded for creating products with staying power.

They basically provide all the services that a publisher would have back in the day - except vastly better. And back in the day the publisher would take 80% and leave you 20% (and you would receive $0 in 'royalties' until 100% of all of the publisher's expenses were paid for - because you know, developers don't have any expenses apparently). Steam instead takes 30% and leaves you 70%. Piracy has nothing to do with why people put their product on Steam. Many (and I want to say the vast majority) of cracked games you can download are from Steam. The DRM isn't particularly secure. It's just enough that you can't simply copy the directory and send it to a friend or torrent it. People determined to infringe your copyright will break any sort of DRM system. Steam acknowledges this and has their system built accordingly.

In cases where developers have the game directly for sale on their homepage, sometimes you can get it even cheaper than on Steam. After all they get about 43% more revenue per sale (minus expenses) when you buy it directly from them. Steam's also fine with this. For some products you can even buy steam keys cheaper from the developer than you can get them on Steam. Steam offers steam keys for free to developers and have no problem with them reselling them even though they end up getting 0% of the revenue. In today's era of scummy companies doing scummy things because 'fuck you I can' I can't say enough good about Steam. They are a prototypical benevolent monopoly. Hopefully Gabe keeps the company in good hands.

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[–] Vhaine 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago 

I often pay extra to get the game on steam. I rarely buy keys from steam directly. It provides a unified library of uninstalled games. Metric and social are not required but fun. However, a single cloud library is a service I'm willing to pay for. It's like an unlimited drop box for installers and save files. Everything else is just fluff. No comparable service exist that supports such a large library.

Gog, this is the real feature set required to compete with steam. Make a better game library. Make it and they will come.

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[–] tecuani 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

They are in fact testing such a thing: https://www.gog.com/galaxy

So far, it is just for Windows, but it would be logical to make builds for all the systems that they sell games for, and I remember that I read something like that somewhere.

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[–] doomsdrzej 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I find Steam extremely convenient so I wouldn't change a thing.

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