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[–] setitimer 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

That is pretty much how it already works. Most of the grunt work of video games is performed by "engines" that developers license. They don't make the whole thing from scratch.

When a company develops a game, most of the work goes into the writing, the environments, and the design of quests and other mechanics that are specific to that game. The software to render objects, to deal with collisions and physics, to animate characters and place models in the world, etc, is in various "engines" that they bought from someone else. That's why when you fire up a game, you'll see tons of credits like Unreal Engine, Havok, Speedtree, etc. Those are all different software components that went into the game to make various things work.

Of course, some games are almost literally mods of other games, where not just engines but pretty much everything is reused. Fallout New Vegas is a good example of this; it is basically a mod of Fallout 3, and all of its game systems are compatible, to the extent that you can actually run the Fallout 3 campaign in the Fallout New Vegas engine.

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[–] moons [S] ago 

When a company develops a game, most of the work goes into the writing, the environments, and the design of quests and other mechanics that are specific to that game.

The same happens in a theatre productions, minus "design of the quest" (not sure what that means) and the other mechanics which in my opinion is a whole other medium, and rather than building the same things over again they recycle a lot of the work. What if we had a stockpile of not just environments but outfits and sound effects and whatever else. Kind of like a real life studio. Besides, that's all peripheral, I'm focused on the story. That should be the meat of it not these gimmicks.

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[–] setitimer ago 

"Quests" are the linked series of objectives that player characters carry out in order to move the plot forward. They aren't called that in every genre of games, but they are fairly common. Even if the basic game engine provides a mechanism to create quests, they are challenging to get right. You have to make sure that the objectives make sense, that if the player makes a particular decision it closes off certain future options and opens up other ones, etc.

You can say that you want to focus on "story" but really it's these "gimmicks" that enable a game to have a compelling story. If you don't do things like quests, your player may as well be watching a movie. You might want to check out these short articles by David Gaider, lead writer for the Dragon Age games, on basics of how that works. (The articles are in reverse order on that page, so scroll down for Part 1).

[–] [deleted] ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] moons [S] 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

The paid mod is the game

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[–] Pyractic ago 

Dunno dude. It's a nice idea and all, and in reality is already in practice (Gmod being the biggest) But on a large-scale medium, the average person wouldn't buy the framework of the game, and then download many, many mods to actually have a "complete" game. The game would be released and nothing solid would be in it for weeks, even months before we could play. Hence, that's why they make the game, and then the mods flow in afterwards. Making moneys is also a problem for them if they released the whole thing but for 1/10th for the price. Then for the modders, there would be a massive debate as to how much they should get for the mod.

We let the developer create the stage and we, ourselves, wrote the play; we'd essentially be crowd sourcing creativity. I know we kind of already do this with mods but we do it in the same way we have public theater productions.

I honestly think that this is a good thing. We have the stage, we have the tools for the stage, and what is on this stage. Then with mods, we can put more or even entirely re-write the play. But make the actual stage? Yeah I'm ok. By the way, you should check out this videogame https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/thoughtstem/codespells-express-yourself-with-magic It's got a lot going for it, and sounds a bit like what you're talking about.

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[–] moons [S] 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Then for the modders, there would be a massive debate as to how much they should get for the mod.

Same thing happened with Louis CK and what he did set the bar for online streaming, that's why I said 5 bucks; it was the same number louis gave. Besides, why not just let the market decide?

My issue with mods is production value. If we applied the same techniques we see in theater, that would take the onus off the people who built the stage and thus allowing people to specialize. The idea is to make it more accessible. This is a crude analogy, but there's this saying where if you have enough monkeys tapping randomly at a keyboard eventually they'll, statistically speaking, they'll accidentally write a line of shakespeare; the difference that I'm talking about is putting in more monkeys into the room to increase our odds.