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[–] CrustyBeaver52 0 points 128 points (+128|-0) ago 

Step#1 - Have wealthy parents

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[–] Shekelstein6M 0 points 78 points (+78|-0) ago 

Brilliant. But I have an even better solution.

Step 1: buy lottery ticket

Step 2: fill out the lottery ticket with the correct numbers

Step 3: collect the winnings

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[–] kjell 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Step 4: Blow money on stupid shit.

Step 5: Fuck taxes

Step 6: Come out deeper in debt.

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[–] CrustyBeaver52 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

Apparently some super autist math prof figured out how to reverse engineer the algorithm for the winning scratch tickets - just by looking at them - he laid it all out in this big presentation to the lottery commission here - and they buried it - apparently, there is only two or three companies that do the scratch tickets for all of North America - and it is cheaper to pretend it didn't happen than it is to fix the code!

LMAO

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[–] 2drunk 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'm stuck at step 1.5. Lottery ticket stuck to penis.

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[–] SumTingWong 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

How is 3 steps better than 1?

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[–] Skyrock 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

If you don't have rich family yet, get some by being adopted or marrying up. We will leave the details to our readership as an exercise.

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[–] Sveenee 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

Step 2: Don't be poor.

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[–] aria_taint 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Step 2 not needed.

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[–] BillMarshall 1 points 55 points (+56|-1) ago 

So the mother gave her daughter an overpaid job and a condo and then conned the grandparents onto taking her and her cuck husband in so they could live free while they paid off debt she shouldn't have incurred. Got it. Al I need is a rich mommy, a rich grandma and no self respect and I too can become debt free.

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

You got it! Easy, isn't it?

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[–] culofiesta 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

My father would charge me rent if I moved back in after I moved out. Couldn't blame him either. An adult should move out of the house. Why the fuck didn't her mother charge her?

But yet, I'm the 'privileged' one

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[–] klobos 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

My parents wouldn't charge me if I had to move back in for some reason. But I would definitely give them more then the rents worth every month.

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[–] Goathole 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

Yeah I'm reading that dripping sarcasm of yours and the conformation boas that incited it all while laughing. While this story may have a bullshit plot, which you seem to be enjoying ever so much, your statement isn't at all true.

You don't need "a rich mommy, a rich grandma and no self respect", all you need to do is not take on more debt that you can handle and to manage your money well. That means skipping that mocha choca latte 5 days week in the morning, scale back your bar bill for Friday and Saturday and maybe cook at home a few nights instead of going out.

We all had to do it, you ain't speshal pumpkin.

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[–] Cant_Call_It 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

That's all true, but in the context of the original post, we are to assume the crowd she is talking to is already in debt. She is clearly making the claim that anyone, no matter their situation, can pay their student loans off in a year. She is completely blind to the fact that she has held on to her family's coat tails her entire life and that most people actually have to pay bills such as fucking rent.

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[–] Matter_and_Form 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You do realize that isn't most people's reality, right? Fucking snowflakes who've never seen an honest day's work.

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

She made the most of her situation which in itself is not bad. Just the entitlement that it must be easy for everyone, because it was easy for her is striking.

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[–] Kr1ll1nX 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

Just don't fucking go to the bar. That right there will save tons.

Get a Costco membership, and buy the store brand scotch. It comes in a 1.75l bottle for $20.

You just saved yourself a metric fuck-ton of money on getting "buzzed".

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[–] wahala 0 points 31 points (+31|-0) ago 

Yeah! I got out of student loan debt and all I had to do is mooch off my mommy and live in Joliet, IL! Seriously, Joliet? Ugh.

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[–] phenomenaldouche 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago  (edited ago)

My thoughts as well. I mean, it's great that her family basically paid off her debt for her and all, but Joliet is kind of a shithole.

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[–] chris 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago  (edited ago)

*Joilet

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] wahala 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I left that Stink-state after college and moved to the Deep South. Best decision I ever made. Cost of living is so low I have paid off my student loans and all of my personal debt except my mortgage - with no help from any of my parents/anyone.

I do wish Dave's Bookstore was still around in Joliet, though. Great incense and Dave was a cool dude. It was rather creepy being accosted by the homeless who hung around the church across the street, though. Ah, Joliet memberberries....

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[–] Sveenee 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

The only thing I know about Joliet is the prison. And everywhere I've been that has a prison near it isn't a place I want to be.

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[–] drunkywood 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Don't bother coming to WI, you wouldn't like it. ;P

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[–] CrustyBeaver52 0 points 26 points (+26|-0) ago 

I put myself through it - painter, security guard, pizza driver, etc - but it cost a hell of a lot less to do it then - now, unless your are majored in STEM, or one of the trades, I would not go. The payoff is simply not there.

Find a busy flea market, sell slices and pop for ten years - retire in Florida, or anywhere else you like. You'll have plenty of time for reading on the beach.

For those not in the know - Students loans are a finance scam designed to steal retirement pension money. Similar to the previous home loans scam, the only difference being the type of loan - the rest of the structure is similar. This is a type of accounting fraud, and if you borrow between a quarter and half a million dollars, just to go to school, with no means of repaying that money, believe it or not, you are the one being defrauded. The loans industry knows full well the failure rates and the abilities to repay - they are obliged by law not to lend you the money when you have no viable means of repayment.

They are doing this because they are selling the loans to pension funds, lying to them about the stability of the loans. Pension funds are restricted by law to invest only in AAA rated securities. There is where the scam is - the lenders know the loans are not AAA, but they tell the pension funds they are. They already know you can't repay the loan. The pension fund managers know the loans will fail as well, but many are being offered considerable "inducements" to look the other way. Fund Clients are fucking clueless as to how their money is being stolen.

Now, the government knows all about this type of crime, and they have the responsibility to enforce the laws in this area. However, when the government is corrupted, as it has been the last 20 years, they too play a part in allowing this scam to occur - just as they did with the home loans. During the home loans scandal, the government made sure the banks got paid, while home owners lost their homes.

There is no free ride. Somehow, somewhere, somebody is getting paid. If it is not you then cover your ass.

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[–] littul_kitton 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Similar to the previous home loans scam, ...

The recent news is that Obama found a way to make the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac debacles worse. He declared them to be permanently unprofitable, confiscated their capital stock, and then lo and behold when profits showed up used them to fund Obamacare. Without bothering to get an appropriation. The missing money is said to amount to $100+ billion, although that seems implausibly large.

It's psychopathic con artists all the way down.

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[–] CrustyBeaver52 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Yup - this has been going on for a LONG time.

Each time one version is shut down, they just switch it to another sector of the economy, rinse and repeat.

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[–] chris 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

So what's the solution to this problem, have an independent or government body do the loan ratings?

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[–] CrustyBeaver52 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

Nope - restoring the right for students to declare bankruptcy on non-repayable loans is what we want -

Do that and the fraudulent lending will cease.

That act alone will collapse the student loan fraud industry - and drive tuition rates down to normal price levels the market can carry.

Bush jr's admin passed this "no bankruptcy on student loans" to allow this crime to take place, because without that law they couldn't convince the ratings agencies to rate any of the student loans as AAA debt. Without that rating - pension funds are banned by law from purchasing these loans.

One Trump executive order could possibly fix this entire mess.

Furthermore - removing that law will cut the SJW agenda from the universities - because those courses give no employable skillset to the students - so those are the students who will have the greatest bankruptcy rates - schools will no longer be willing or able to offer these garbage courses.

Hey TRUMP!!!!!

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[–] library_of_stupid 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Lynching a few bankers and Wall Street kikes would be a good start. Then again, lynching bankers is always a good start regardless of what you set out to do.

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[–] Rotteuxx 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I'd say more reasonable tuition fees and less for-profit schools.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] ProbablyNudeRightNow 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

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[–] lopan 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

I'm more irritated that some dumb ass actually wrote this article and was able to have it published

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[–] bourbonexpert 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

im so thankful i was too poor to go to college when i was 20, and went to trade school at 27. im only 17k in debt.

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[–] CRKT_M16Z 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

And now you probably have a job relevant to the field your trained in and are a productive member of society. I just figured you probably wouldn't contribute much to society if you majored in gender studies, whatever the fuck that really is......

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[–] 8422025 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

I'm guessing condo rental income over 3 years wouldn't add up to a huge fraction of the student loan value. The moving and condo gift help, but it's not sufficient by itself to total$70k/year in loan payments.

This kind of stuff is feasible if you make a lot of money and don't spend most of it. This particular example is just not so applicable to most due to the big assist.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] 8422324 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

That's odd too, but high income jobs are probably more common among younger folks than free condos and moving in with older relatives after getting a decent job.

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[–] CrustyBeaver52 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It is probably most common in wealthy families - parents are concerned their children get a good start in the job market - once your kid is in the business, he or she can start meeting people who actually work for a living, and branch out from there.

Another point that is common in wealthy families is selling the business to one of your children when your retire - it is often the best way to actually get the full dollar value out of your business - selling an entire business is extremely risky - and it helps you to stay in control of the family fortunes after you retire. Besides, you usually leave everything to your kids when your time is done.

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[–] Gorillion 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

It's not just the rental income, it's the ability to nullify your own rent at will. And everything else thrown in I bet. Utilities. Groceries. Cars were likely free or loaners from the family with free refills.

Basically: "You can pay off 200k student loan debt soon after graduation if you have a lot of money coming in and near zero expenditure"

Which is also known as: "No shit, Sherlock."

The story is presented as a challenging experience, but involves none of the actual stressors of paying off a huge loan.

I'm trying to figure out what it's true purpose would be, it's such valueless "advice". To make it seem like 200k loans are no big thang, so more dumb rich kids take them out? Or subtle advice to dumb rich kids with 200k student loans, and their parents too maybe, to pay them off by leveraging their available resources to prioritize giving the debt holders back. Maybe there's a rash of defaulting going on? Maybe this is for the parents to show their kids and offer a similar deal, because it's likely the parents will be on the hook for the whole lot because they co-signed the loan?

Whatever this bullshit is, it's not what it appears to be on the surface, because it's complete garbage that would only apply to the tiniest of tiny demographics.

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[–] 8423224 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

Pretend it's a $3k/month swing. It's probably less. Still less than half of the loan balance over the course of 3 years, which is far more time than they had those arrangements.

There's more to this than a free condo and rent (but those obviously help speed up the process).

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[–] Broc_Lia 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I just did a quick check. Two bed appartments go for roughly $1100 a month there. Let's assume she was only renting the appartment for two out of the three years, and give a month's downtime for turnaround and $1100 in cleaning and repair bills, that's still $24,000 off her bill.

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[–] 8422369 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

But still a pretty small fraction of $200k+.

I might be biased because I don't do anything crazy and can afford to add about $50k/year to investments (including employer match) on a well-under $100k salary. So these stories seem perfectly plausible, even without so much help.

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[–] 8423360 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

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[–] voats4goats 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

You know I was patiently waiting for a link to an onion article.

Free house, free money, = debt free! Dave Ramsey better look out! There is a new finance guru in town!

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[–] CRKT_M16Z 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thank you!

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