[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] 6double5321 [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I'm an idiot. I did some more reading, after you linked me to @toats ketchup posts. You answered a question I had on two different projects. I was under the impression you had to use either a straight/natural ferment ( pressed cider with wild yeasts ) , A sugared/honey ferment using packaged yeasts for different applications, or ( I learned this can be done four ways...) a "lacto(?)" ferment can be accomplished using citric acid : powdered for cheese-making, lemon(orange also works) juice, or you can use [black magic] naturally present bacteria, or "any acid" such as white(flavored) vinegar.

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[–] toats 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Lacto fermenting is using lactobacillus to convert sugars to lactic acid, which sours the fermentation and protects it from mold and other bacteria. This is the process for kimchi, sauerkraut, pickles, sour beer, and yoghurts.

Yeast fermentation is different and produces alcohol from sugars, which can later be turned into acetic acid by acetobacter when making vinegar. Yeast bread and alcohol and vinegars are produced this way.

You can add sugar to either, which will increase the amount of lactic acid or acetic acid in the result (increases sour potential if fully fermented). I don't really think giving a fermentation more sugars will get you different flavours but it will add sourness or alcohol if the microbes can still handle the existing amount.

Adding acid to a fresh ferment can help protect the food from the bad bacteria or molds while the good ones get started (since, in this case, the good bacteria can tolerate acidity).