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[–] srgmpdns 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It wasn't all that long ago the Europe and Britain were joined by a land bridge- ca. 9000 years ago.

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/maps/doggerland/

I find it not all that implausible that some kind Proto-Germanic speakers, as well as Celtic languages speakers, could have been in Britain long before Vikings, Anglo-Saxons or even the Romans arrived. I'd like to see some evidence, though.

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[–] BillyLuath 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I've read a few websites/papers that proposed Ænglich (Anglo Saxon) existed in Britain for centuries before the Roman withdrawal, over the years.

It's not catching on in academia, though, is it?

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[–] bb22 [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Academia is never going to "catch up" to anything without a cultural shift. Things haven't changed much since Copernicus' time. But I do think that younger generations are definitely taking a closer look at this stuff than the old generations ever did. We have more information available today, and more readily accessible too.

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[–] i_scream_trucks 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Name a 5th century writer.

Listen to how you construct your sentences. It's Germanic.

If the narrative that the Germans were originally invited over as mercenaries is true, there should be more Welsh words in English.

By the time of the well attested Germanic invasion Celtic Welsh and Romano Briton British were nothing like each other. So no, that would not have been more Welsh words as the Welsh were not related to the rest of England.

Dr Oppenheimer

What a Cohencidence. I'll look forward to your research on how the Germanic invasion was actually Sudanese people.

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[–] bb22 [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Read more carefully. No one is saying English isn't a Germanic language. The argument is that it was not imported from continental Europe but developed independently since the Bronze Age as a 4th branch of the Germanic language family. The Germanic language family applies to more historical regions than just modern-day Germany you know.

Gildas was born at the very end of the 5th century and wrote on recent British history. Saint Patrick is also a source for the period. There are also two Chronica Gallicas from 452 and 511. The point is, it would have been a massive undertaking to not only displace 2 to 2.5 million people, but absorb hardly any of their language at the same time, particularly when we are told that the Germans were invited to Britain as mercenaries.