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[–] TheBuddha 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Yeah, I just watched a few docs about this about two months ago. There's a whole lot of skepticism and the geological record, and archeological record, do not have evidence that supports the claims. This isn't my field, but I then went and did a bit of reading to learn more. I'm absolutely not an expert but I'll parrot some.

Note, that doesn't mean it didn't happen. It just means that many of the claims don't have supporting evidence.

If we look at the evidence for the impact off the Mexican coast that possibly killed the dinosaurs, we can find layers of dark soil that match the traits of impact debris. If we look at other known events, there are records in the ice cores and things like that.

I'd not say its discredited, simply that evidence is lacking to conclude they are correct. In the case of the impact off the Yucitan, there's a geological record of it across the entire globe. They've even got a fancy name for that layer, but I forgot it. There are dino bones below that layer. There are no dino bones above that layer. In fact, all large land dwelling animals below that layer don't exist above that layer.

And that's a part of the supporting evidence. For what these folks are claiming, there aren't even impact craters. Time could hide them and they could have exploded in the air, but that's not really something very solid to base a theory on.

If you weren't aware, these folks are part of a small group who think the impacts had greater frequency and more devastating effects than we have records for. There's like a half dozen events they are saying were caused by impacts and the evidence just isn't there.

Edit: I still threw you a vote, as it's an interesting topic.

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[–] bb22 [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Here you go, the paper I alluded to in my earlier reply to you, now posted in the subverse: https://voat.co/v/chronology/2469875

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[–] bb22 [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

There’s also the nano-diamonds paper that Graham Hancock references in his work, and I’m going to post it here next. Look at the “Scab lands” in Montana. They were dug out by an immense torrent of water, catastrophically. The academic paper I’m referring to about nano-diamonds, these tiny diamonds could only be created by the pressure and heat of an enormous impact and they are found distributed in a common strata all over the northern hemisphere. A whole team of university academics worked on this paper, which you’ll see when I post it. That is direct evidence of a catastrophic impact and it appears to have been centered in Montana (Scab lands) with lesser impacts trailing across the US. There are known smatterings of craters along the North Carolina coast, for example, some of which are circular lakes now.

Also the school of thought you’re referring to about catastrophes being more common than thought, is called “catastrophism.” It’s a response to the earlier theory of everything on Earth developing very slowly over a long, long, time, which dates back at least to the 1800s and went along with the theory of Darwinian evolution. Darwinian evolution has been seriously undermined by discoveries such as that different animals, plants, even bacteria can swap genes from one another, not to mention the study of epigenetics.