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[–] i_am_not_crazy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I am not really sure what to ask, but as somehow who fears going deaf I have always wondered how easy it is to ASL, and how those who lost their hearing later in life deaf are perceived/treated by those born deaf?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It can vary. Deaf culture, and I mean big D not small d- the difference is people who are actively signing and participating in deaf culture are "Deaf" while those aren't are just "deaf" - can be very exclusionary of people that they think are betraying/not supporting Deaf culture.

Of course, I think this is utterly ridiculous and I'm sure some Deaf people agree. Learning ASL isn't that hard to start with, but being a native/integrated speaker will take a while. There's a lot of nuances and stuff to it. Deaf people, some of them, might look down upon someone who doesn't know sign language or has a cochlear implant. I am not a fan of this bigotry at all. But basically, if you are a fluent signer you will probably be welcomed into Deaf culture. It's a sticky issue and has a lot of reasons, not ones that I necessarily agree with.

tl;dr if you know sign language you'll be included. if not, you might not be as much. depends on the community.

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[–] i_am_not_crazy 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

thank you!

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[–] Well_Fathom_That 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

As a hearing person, what do you think is the best way for me to learn sign language?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Look up ASL classes in your area, or start online. You could also try finding a deaf person to webcam with, if they were interested. But yeah, there are a lot of website onlines with sign dictionaries. Lifeprint.com is a good one, I would think.

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[–] okjersey 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I remember hearing somewhere that sign-language is fairly universal. Meaning that someone from say, Spain, wouldn't have a difficult time signing with someone from the US or England because the signs themselves are pretty similar. Is that accurate? Where if you were speaking verbally your languages would make it so you couldn't understand one another, but sign transcends those barriers?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Fairly universal is a pretty big overstatement. Gestures and maybe some signs would get across, but there are different sign languages in every region, just like for spoken languages. I mean, Dutch and/or German are somewhat related to English, but that doesn't really make it easier to understand what people are asking. So, no, it'd be mostly makeshift gestures, not an "universal" sign language. People are misled on that one.

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[–] ChubbyTiger 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

How does music feel to you? I assume you feel the vibrations. Is there any song/genre that feels better?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Music turned up all the way in the car feels pretty good. I do feel the vibrations, mainly the bass. So I feel the beat but not any subtleties or nuances of the music. I think any genre with a good beat and heavy bass would work- I listen to a CD called Bastille in my mom's car, apparently they're indie pop/rock (just looked them up.) That CD had a good beat. But if I were to pick my own music, I'd probably try some hip-hop out.

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[–] ChubbyTiger 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

We sung a song by them for my graduation. Glad you like them, even if only for their beat haha. I had another short question. Are there such things as accents in ASL? Would it be just speed variables, for example for someone who is just learning ASL.

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[–] oaken 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Was there a "deaf culture" at your school? As in, was your school different in any interesting ways in terms of things like socializing, dating, making friends etc compared to regular schools?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yeah, there's a wide deaf culture in most deaf communities. I'm not sure what to mention right now, but for one thing, physical contact is way less frowned upon, and yelling really loudly is a thing, especially when you're narrating an exciting story. The community though, at my high school, was kind of lame and dramatic. A lot of dating didn't happen because people would make a big deal out of it, I think. I lived in the dorm, so we'd socialize in there. We'd just pile into the living room or someone's room and sit around and chat.

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[–] okjersey 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

How has going to school for the deaf prepared you for adult-life? I assume that most classes were taught using ASL, so I guess what I mean is, did make it harder to transition to a work environment where most people aren't fluent in ASL?

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[–] leetdood [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I attended about 3 out of 4 classes at the adjacent hearing high school every term. So, it prepared me a little for the real work world, but at the same time my real life experience was a little limited because of how I interacted with others. I was always a booky nerd, so having limited interaction/socialization with others and behind behind on the social track because I transferred in before grade 4, it didn't really help prepare me for life or socialization. But it did help me understand how to communicate with others who can hear, with paper or pen or an interpreter. I was always a little 'outcasted' (not sure what word i should use) because of how "smart" I was and how autistic I acted a lot of the time.

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[–] okjersey 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Along the same lines, did you have to remind the teacher to place face the classroom instead of the white-board while speaking, so you could learn as well? How did you overcome that?