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[–] Fuhrer 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Same with drugs, but oh well…

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[–] sarmad3000 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's because legislation is always very slow at reacting to changing views in society... an example of "the other side of the coin", smoking has been proven to massively contribute to bad health, cancer, heart conditions, etc. and it still took far too many years just to ban advertising... not sure how long until we finally ban smoking altogether.

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[–] Kleyno 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I bet you would if it was legalised and they started opening Little Finger style brothels. ;)

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[–] ChocolatesBetter 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I bet a lot more people would. If it's legal many more people would think it's morally OK

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] SophisticatedMonkey 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

George Carlin said it best

"Selling is legal. Fucking is legal. Why isn't selling fucking legal?"

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[–] Blastedkitty 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I find it ridiculous that a government will care the matter in witch people get laid. That is really infringing in our personal freedoms, agrre or disagree on the subject of prostitution.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] gurlat 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Nevada isn't really a good example to look at. It's surrounded by areas where prostitution is illegal, and within driving distance too. So obviously women who want to work as prostitutes travel there (oh wait, that's trafficking) as do their customers. Nevada is also very reliant on the gambling industry (and tourism). Gambling is well known to have an effect on criminal activity (people get into debt and do stupid things to make money).

Nevada is just too unique to be a good example.

You really want to look at countries like New Zealand, Holland, and parts of Australia where prostitution has been legalised.

I can't really talk about the other countries I mentioned. But I've lived in New Zealand for several decades, both prior and since the passing of the 2003 Prostitution Reform Act, which legalised prostitution. The main effects that I'm aware of are....

Pro's

  • Criminal gangs no longer control the prostitution industry. (Running a brothel requires a licence, you can't get a licence if you have criminal convictions).

  • Drug use among prostitutes has fallen dramatically (Brothels will be shut down if drugs are used on the premises)

  • Clients who assault or harm prostitutes get arrested (because prostitutes don't fear calling the cops), consequently violence against prostitutes has fallen dramatically.

  • Safe sex practices are now standard, this has reduced STD rates among prostitutes and their customers (Prostitution with a condom is legal, without one it's illegal, a brothel can be shut down for allowing unsafe sex to occur on their premises).

  • Underage prostitution has been all but eliminated. (Brothel owners aren't going to risk their licence just to let a 17 year old work for them).

  • Basically, most of the criminal activities associated with prostitution, violence, drug use, sexual violence, have been removed.

Cons.

  • There are a lot of council zoning complaints i.e. Should brothels be zoned "industrial" or "commericial"? What sort of signage should the be allowed... Currently it's a grey area.

  • A lot of NIMBY complaints. Now that the gangs have been forced out of the prostitution industry, a lot of prostitutes work together, 6 or 8 of them may rent a house or apartment together, so they have somewhere to take customers. Needless to say, the neighbors aren't too happy when they figure out why the 5 attractive ladies that just moved in next door are getting over a dozen male visitors a day, and none of them seems to stay for more than an hour or two....??? . (The police won't do anything about it, it's more of a zoning issue, ie. a commercial business in a residential zone).

  • The police have very little power to deal with street walkers. Brothels are required to be drug free, and they can't hire women with serious criminal convictions.. There are very few street walkers left, but those are on the street tend to be those with drug problems, criminal histories, or serious mental/personality issues. Since it's not actually illegal to walk up to someone on the street and offer them a blowjob for $50, there's not a lot the police can do about them. But people who live on the streets where streetwalkers tend to congregate aren't exactly happy about it.

Other...

  • There have been a few ethical issues that have popped up. Like a government funded homecare worker who looked after a mentally disabled man, who was found to be taking him to brothel once a month. The disabled man wasn't complaining, the homecare worker said that it improved his mood (he may be intellectually disabled, but he still has the same physiological urges as any other adult man).. But a lot of people got angry when they found out the government was paying for prostitutes. (not officially, but effectively).

  • There's been no noticeable difference in taxes. Very few prostitutes want to file a tax return explaining where their income came from from. On the other hand, the police and courts have saved hundreds of thousands of man hours arresting and convicting prostitutes and their clients.

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[–] oswaldvonwolkenstein [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's not fully legalized in Nevada and we have all of Europe to prove that the answer to everyone of those questions is yes, if you fully legalize it. When prostitution was legalized and taxed in Cologne - about 10 years ago - I think - the city reduced the spread of STIs by requiring mandatory testing and vendor licenses for the sex-workers, gained 25 Million Euros in new tax revenue and were able to uncover and break up 5 sex-slavery rings - the human trafficking operations naturally refused to comply with the legal regulations and stood out like a sore thumb and were easy to find. Additionally the number of other crimes (mostly violent assaults on women and theft) associated with prostitution nearly vanished. - So the answer to all of those questions is yes - the reason why I wouldn't use Nevada as an example is because prostitution is legal in certain establishments only, most of which are set up out in the middle of nowhere - and studies have shown that the decision to pay for sex is usually an impulsive one - so the half-assed legalization in Nevada is not a good measure of what legalization would do.

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[–] shitty_reaction_gifs 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

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[–] n8d 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Oh the future would be a great place if it were so.

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[–] jawsgst 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

but Jeebus says it's bad so it's bad, OK...but seriously, it is all religion keeping this illegal