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[–] chags 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Oh, look! A touch tablet/stylus.

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[–] 8910970? 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Do you get kickbacks from subtly throwing in the word "porn" where it doesn't belong?

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[–] NeedleStack [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Hmmm.. that's a good idea. Mama needs a yarn fund.

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[–] NeedleStack [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Otherwise known as the Mignon Model 4 index typewriter.

Index typewriters:

Coming into the market in the early 1880s, the index typewriter uses a pointer or stylus to choose a letter from an index. The pointer is mechanically linked so that the letter chosen could then be printed, most often by the activation of a lever.

The index typewriter was briefly popular in niche markets. Although they were slower than keyboard type machines they were mechanically simpler and lighter, they were therefore marketed as being suitable for travellers, and because they could be produced more cheaply then keyboard machines, as budget machines for users who needed to produce small quantities of typed correspondence. The index typewriter's niche appeal however soon disappeared, as on the one hand new keyboard typewriters became lighter and more portable and on the other refurbished second hand machines began to become available. The last widely available western index machine was the Mignon typewriter produced by AEG which was produced until 1934. Considered one of the very best of the index typewriters, part of the Mignon's popularity was that it featured both interchangeable indexes and type, allowing the use of different fonts and character sets, something very few keyboard machines allowed and only at considerable added cost.

Although pushed out of the market in most of the world by keyboard machines, successful Japanese and Chinese typewriters are of the index type albeit with a very much larger index and number of type elements.

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