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[–] Shakshuka 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I just now finished watching Interstellar and I don't have to tell you how good it is. It is mostly plot driven, with plenty of twists. I could break the movie into three movements: I could say the first ends at launch but I feel the wave is the batter turning point. The second part ends when Mann attacks Cooper.

Scrumptious Sci-Fi. Who doesn't like to entertain wormhole travel? And the singularity scene pinched my surreal nerve hard. While watching (Hathaway, especially) I was drawing comparisons with Gravity. The departure scene reminded me of George Clooney's character, for example. Interstellar is more generally entertaining, so to speak, and Gravity pushes expansive and unending suspense that is a heavier weight to bear. Interstellar also verbalizes more; Nolan spells things out sometimes to my slight annoyance. Gonna chew on my first viewing some more. It's already on my rewatch list.

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[–] DrSalt 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Tomorrowland - at the cinema for $1.25. I thought it shared a lot with Jupiter Rising in that a maturing girl discovers a key role in her own world and others. I read hundreds of individual reviews of both films - I'm surprised how negative people were on Tomorrowland - I enjoyed it and felt like people seeking plot holes must have lost their sense of imagination that the film itself is criticizing. It's big budget and massively corporate creation - but it didn't seem that way. It's so odd when I know that Evil Corp creates such an art - but that it has a decent sense of standing up to such things.

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[–] AtomicManiac 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Well I'm on a quest to watch 365 movies this year. So far this week I've watched a handful. I'll give a few brief thoughts.

Whiplash - First watching, it's good overall but I feel like I missed out on some stuff. I'm gonna watch it again in the future.

Roadhouse - GREAT 80s flick. The pacing starts to get a little long towards the end, still worth watching though.

Exit Through the Giftshop - Honestly I just watched this because the song was stuck in my head. I'll never know if this film was staged or if it's a true documentary, certainly stranger things have happened. Either way it's a fantastic film.

Best In Show - This one takes a little bit to get started and on the whole isn't nearly as good as This Is Spinal Tap. It's not something I would recommend.

House Arrest - Nostalgia bomb.

O Brother Where Art Thou - Didn't like it. It felt boring and didn't really have a story that pulled me in.

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[–] RoboGriffin 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Christopher Lee's death compelled me to look into his acting career. This week I managed to watch a film I put on my list because of his passing. I watched The Wicker Man (1973). Lee's charming psychopath was amazing to watch and I enjoyed the entire movie even though bits of it felt somewhat dated. The credit roll took me by surprise at the sudden end of the movie. This movie's overall feel reminded me a lot of the feeling I had after viewing apocalypse now. Would highly recommend to anyone looking for a good watch.

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[–] AguyinaRPG 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Into the Woods, the recent film version.

I was in a first act version of the play in 7th grade (as the wolf) and have always had a beyond vivid memory of the story and the songs. It's ultimately very silly, even as things turn around in the second act, though remains enjoyable for its clever use of characters and criss-crossing interactions. The nostalgia trip I got from the movie was definitely real, but it's really hard to recommend.

On the level of an adaptation, this film is basically perfect, save for a few scenes which I'm baffled about why they dropped. If you wanted to see a Hollywood budget version of the stage play, this is exactly that. No frills, no alterations, word for word script. That's also the movie's downfall. Almost nothing about it feels like it should have been a film. It moves at a breakneck pace constantly, with extended shots for the singing sequences which interrupt with the editing of other parts of the film. The atmosphere that comes from it being a bombastic stage play is completely lost. While the characters are memorable, they have no defining characteristics and jump from one pallet of emotions to the next with no transition.

Some notable omissions of scenes that the audience would have been better off seeing include: Cinderella dancing with her prince, Jack encountering the Giants in the Sky, Rapunzel being visited by her Prince, and red riding Hood's Grandmother greeting the Wolf. One would think that they would have sacrificed a bit of the inter-connectedness to achieve greater empathy, but they are rote in their adherence to details which are there to fill roles more than anything.

There were a couple great filmic sequences that I wish they did more with to give the film some personality. When Cinderella is fleeing the third night of the ball, the entire world goes to freeze frame except for her. It makes complete sense, because the musical number is long and introspective, not really conducive to the logic of the Prince's actions in the film. The Last Midnight was one hell of an engaging visual sequence, and Meryl Streep absolutely steals the show with a pitch and rhythm perfect rendition of the song. These are the only ones that truly stand out though. Even instances of pure action like the final scene are incredibly bland and lack weight of any kind.

There is one thematic element about this story that I really like that really gets enhanced in the second act. The idea of "taking on the sins of the father", and how families are connected and grow from strange circumstances. Even though the father's appearance is woefully undercut by the lack of any musical number (and in the film, making it obvious he's a ghost), the idea of the Baker trying to abandon his problems is the real thread of the narrative that's easy to sympathize with. In The Last Midnight, the Witch even remarks how the Baker's son will be just as bad as his father and grandfather, and I think that's the thread that most people will deny her absolutism. It was played just right, yet other things like the concept of blame and responsibility are barely even shown as themes.

Watch if you're really into musicals and just want to see a straightforward translation that hasn't been seen in decades, probably. It's still fun, has some great climaxes, but despite being so faithful really pales in comparison to the stage play.

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[–] PaperEngines 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I watched the dark knight and no country for old men for an english class I am taking.

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[–] contains_nutsndBOLTS [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

What did you think of them?

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[–] PaperEngines 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Both were very good. The class I'm taking is studying villains in films and fiction and these movies had some great antogonists. Anton, in my opinion, is evil incarnate. The purest form. The joker, on the other hand is crazy but free. He laughs when he gets caught. Very strange, right?