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[–] nonPCmasterrace 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

https://www.tonychachere.com/Cajun-Country-Cookbook-P1310.aspx

This. Whether you're wanting to cook Louisiana favorites like gumbo (including how to make a proper roux), jambalaya, etoufee, etc, or wild game, seafood, or pecan pralines, or whatever. This cookbook (and several cans of Tony's seasoning) has been in my household since I was a child. I would probably suggest older prints if possible.

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[–] Empress 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'm in the habit of checking out Alton Brown videos on youtube whenever I'm going to make something for the first time. He breaks things down to the how and why things should be done a certain way.

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[–] 9392256? 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Before I canceled my Netflix, ages ago, me and my SO watched most of Alton Brown's Good Eats. Really a good show.

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[–] ChapterJuni [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I really liked his video on how to carve poultry last thanksgiving, realized I need to watch it again this past week when carving a chicken.

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[–] Funkypurplekitty 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'll have my husband check that one out. He really feels thats someting he should be able to do well. He also loves Alton brown

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[–] Le_Squish 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I live in Hawaii and there are many Asian people and I have many Asian friends so I often try recipes from the Cooking with Dog Channel on YouTube.

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[–] haveanupgoat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I love old church cookbooks. They are usually filled with gems, but as a more modern offering, I really like foodgawker.com. You can find pretty much anything there, including incredibly healthy stuff. One of the best and tastiest foods I like to make is roasted vegetables.

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[–] ChapterJuni [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

What is your favorite seasoning blend for your veggies?

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[–] haveanupgoat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It usually depends on what the vegetable is, but the ones I use in various combinations are:

sea salt

black pepper

garlic salt or powder

thyme (one of my favorites)

Mrs. Dash's Garlic and Herb and Onion and Herb blends

My husband really likes Lawry's Seasoned Salt.

For chicken (I know you asked for veggies, but we love this so much I want to pass it on) Hi Mountain Seasonings Poultry Rub

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[–] OneOfTheBoys 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I normally borrow cookbooks from the library and copy the best recipies. Australian Woman's Weekly cookbooks are always good and lots are Online. CWA books are also good.

Bien Cuit: The art of bread is the best but hardest bread book ever.

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[–] ChapterJuni [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

My library is one of my most precious resources. I love my book club, I wish my work schedule allowed me to join the knit circle. We can even check out a membership to our local children's museum. Our summer reading program also provides the kids with passes to the zoo, local plays, and discount coupons to a variety of museums and restaurants.

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[–] RoundWheel 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

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[–] FlimsyArmadillo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I don't have either. I occasionally look up stuff to switch stuff up on the menu for us if it looks interesting. Now that is summer and being Aussie I typically do a lot of stuff on the BBQ.

I usually just make up my own stuff or go by recipes my grandmother taught me or from things I learned in my 5 years of Home Economics classes (2 years of Home Ec/3 of Catering) during high school.

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[–] ChapterJuni [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I really wish I would have taken advantage of my home economics and agriculture programs in high school. Unfortunately I was on the liberal arts college track. Its taken the better part of a decade to recover.

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[–] FlimsyArmadillo 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I was never a science or math person and enjoyed cooking. I look at friends now that didn't take home ec/catering and while they can cook - they don't seem to be able to come up with something on the fly. I enjoyed it a lot, was fun to learn different techniques, how to make sauces from scratch etc.

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[–] Empress 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Paging @GrandPrismatic. She'll know some great resources I'm sure.

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[–] 9392229? 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I get most of my meal ideas from traveling, and from other people who cook. I also worked at a restaurant in college, and a modern French fine dining restaurant during grad school. Every time my family gets together we decide to cook food from another country/region, and slowly we've developed mental portfolio. For every day, I don't make anything needing a recipe. I just see what we've got in the fridge and figure out what I can make with it.

Two weeks ago I was at the shore with friends and their parents. One woman is a New Yorker of Syrian-Italian decent, and makes the best dolmas, so she explained to me how to make them. It's not a recipe with measurements of ingredients, but more of a process. As soon as I find a local butcher to sell me a lamb shank, I'll be testing it out.

I do collect old-time recipe books from estate sales and library sales. My favorite was actually made by my grandmother and her sisters with their church group, and is an accumulation of recipes and preservation techniques used by homesteaders back in the day. It talks about pickling eggs to bake with throughout the winter, pickling whole watermelons, preserving meats, root cellaring, canning, etc. Interesting stuff.

Aside from a few specific desserts (which I find vary greatly with slight changes in ingredients), I don't feel the need to collect recipes because when I love something, I just remember how to make it, and if I've never made something, it's to easy to look online for a few recipes.

I do like window-shopping recipe books for ideas. Especially if they're from a type of cuisine with which I am not familiar.

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