[–] [deleted] 1 points 31 points (+32|-1) ago  (edited ago)

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[–] RJKH [S] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

This is a very very good point, and I hope you make it to the top of the comments.

I will say though, you should never have expired antibiotics because that means you took them incorrectly. You're supposed to take all of them, even if you "feel better" to prevent that kind of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from developing.

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[–] Subtenko 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

In a lot of cases its probably better to take the medicine even if its expired than not get any kind of treatment

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

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[–] [deleted] 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago 

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You just have to make an informed judgement call. For example, with oxys, you just get a little less high and your back doesn't feel as numb to the pain.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

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[–] RJKH [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

From the article:

As for most asthma medicines, the expiration date is generally one year from the date of sale. So, as you can see, there isn't much science behind it. It's more like an estimation than anything else.

That said, in 1986 the U.S. Department of Defense, in cooperation with the FDA, created the Federal Sheld Life Extension Program (SLEP). In 2001 it essentially acknowledged that most medicines maintain potency long after their expiration dates.

They're pretty much guessing and protecting pharma interests, it seems. You got me doubting, but I googled the program and found this from the FDA themselves.

A medical product is typically labeled by the manufacturer with an expiration date. This reflects the time period during which the product is expected to remain stable, or retain its identity, strength, quality, and purity, when it is properly stored according to its labeled storage conditions. Expiration dating can present challenges to MCM stockpilers because MCMs that have reached their labeled expiration date in most cases cannot be used. While this is important to ensure patient safety, it also means that the MCMs, some of which might still be stable, must be replaced regularly, which can be very costly.

In some cases, testing has shown that certain properly stored medical products can be used beyond their labeled expiration date if they retain their stability. Recognizing stakeholders’ MCM stockpiling challenges, FDA is engaged, when appropriate, in various expiration dating extension activities as described below.

So yeah, your meds probably are still good. Less potent, sure, but there's still some juice in there.

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[–] antiplebbitor 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Depending on composition and chemical stability, some drugs are good for forty years sealed in a bottle.

Some are useless within hours.

Medication expiry is an imperfect system.

But it's better to throw away what might be still possibly good than to risk giving people ineffective or dangerously adulterated medications.

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[–] tame 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Exactly. Some medication (especially supplemental hormones and other stuff with biological origins) spoil. Other stuff is good practically forever.

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[–] Rakosman 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Well, this is good news for all the unfinished prescription pain relievers in my backpacking emergency kit.

I've always assumed they were good long after their expiry, hence why they ended up there in the first place.

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[–] peacegnome 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

This might be the case on some things, but I think that they are just a money grab on others. For example ascorbic acid in powdered form afaik doesn't turn into anything else. So why would it ever expire? I'm sure there are others.

Also, bottled water expiring makes me very suspicious of any dates on goods.

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[–] Veni_Vidi_Vici 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Depending on where you live these dates are mandatory and this can cause confusion.

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[–] savageslav 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

So I have been doing it wrong all this time by keeping all my medicine in the fridge. Why you may ask? I don't know it is just something I always did ...

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[–] RJKH [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Did you grow up with liquid medicines? Even something like Pepto Bismol, when it's cold I think it tastes better and can be relieving going down. Just not the best way to store all medicine.

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[–] Subtenko 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I've never tried pepto until I've tried it warm. Warm it up for 5min, don't drink it hot obviously let it cool down a bit.

Its really grand!

......throws up

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[–] savageslav 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

As the matter of fact I did! Most of the cough medicine that I took as a kid was actually syrup ... Mystery solved :)

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[–] RJKH [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Found this while finding out if my inhaler from the last time I had bronchitis would be worth a shit, given it expired October 2015. I always wondered what those dates were, other than a way to make pharma companies money.

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[–] RJKH [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Understandable viewpoint. I just wanted to make people aware that expiration dates don't mean "it's worthless now," and that means a lot when going to the doctor is costly and so is the medicine.