0
3

[–] catechumen [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451, has long maintained his iconic work is not about censorship, but 'useless' television destroying literature. He has even walked out of a UCLA lecture after students insisted his book was about censorship.

http://www.laweekly.com/news/ray-bradbury-fahrenheit-451-misinterpreted-2149125

0
1

[–] GeorgeBurns 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Art is bigger than the artist. Fuck what the artist thinks he meant, ha.

0
1

[–] 123_456 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Art is subjective. It is what the subject takes away from it. But at the same time they can be dumb as hell.

0
0

[–] gnosticmike 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Tthere is some truth to this as to someone analyzing this book for textual review: Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion; pg. 59-60

Bradbury's early life witnessed the Golden Age of Radio while the transition to the Golden Age of Television began right around the time he started to work on the stories that would eventually lead to Fahrenheit 451. Bradbury saw these forms of media as a threat to the reading of books, indeed as a threat to society, as he believed they could act as a distraction from important affairs. This contempt for mass media and technology would express itself through Mildred and her friends and is an important theme in the book.

But my question is: Does control equate strictly to censorship or does censorship equate to having a different choice that was decided for you already? Is T.V. censorship or control?

0
1

[–] catechumen [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

To answer the question in regards to TV, it's both control and censorship. I don't know that they are equal mixes though. We are inundated with frivolous material that has little real consequence to distract us from things that matter. Then information about consequential material is edited, and censored, and spun until it's a gross caricature of reality; emotions move people better than fact, so if you can sway the emotional response then you can control the overall reaction and opinion.

Both Huxley and Orwell were correct, though the strategies were quite different.

http://teketen.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/orwell_vs_huxley.jpg

1
-1

[–] doctorconimac 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

In elementary school, we often had to talk about what we THINK x art or literature piece was about.

Now that I make my own stuff, it's clear that the creators definitely have a meaning. Unless people ask them for it, their interpretations of what it means will be subject to error.