[–] [deleted] 0 points 39 points (+39|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] johnyapplsede 0 points 29 points (+29|-0) ago 

This deserves .99999999 upvotes

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] HoneyNutStallmans 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Why just 0.99999999 upvotes?

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[–] coconuts 1 point 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

I don't know enough about math to refute that, but that doesn't sound right.

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[–] Arnex 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

It doesn't sound right, but yet it is right. That is what makes math cool!

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[–] ElementalPee 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

It's as true as 1/3 being equal to .3333333

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] TheOneAndOnlyCrumpet 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

What? What look's wrong about it? It's completely correct.

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[–] HubbleSpacePeriscope 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Doesn't this only make sense when using rational numbers? When converted to decimal there is always a rounding error.

Unless we're talking about limits, then this really isn't that remarkable. Using a decimal representation then would be inherently wrong.

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[–] b0utch 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

So if we drop the ''fractional system'', if that's what it's called, because it too unprecise and it doesn't equal 1 anymore. Does it?

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[–] GlipGlops 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Now post the one about whether an airplane on a giant treadmill could take off.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] GlipGlops 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

With appropriate thrust, yes.

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[–] NedTaggart 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Jesus Christ, I don't understand why this one is hard to understand. It's not how fast the wheels turn, it's how the air moved over the lifting surfaces.

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[–] TheOneAndOnlyCrumpet 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Wouldn't that be no?

I'm not very good at physics, but I'm assuming a plane can take off, because when it travels forward it can use the wind it's cutting through to push the wings up and then it can bounce of the air to float upwards.

But on a treadmill it wouldn't be going forward, so there would be no wind and thus it couldn't take off. Unless it was a windy day or something. That's my theory.

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[–] BananaBro 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

The wheels aren't locked, so the plane will indeed take off. The only force the treadmill has on the plane is the friction on the wheels freely spinning, and any propeller, or jet engine plane, easily overcomes this force and would begin to move forward, obtain lift, and take off.

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[–] jeegte12 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

I think this situation is being described terribly, or I just absolutely do not understand physics. So let me ask you nerds this: does the plane have to move forward in order to achieve takeoff? A lot of us are picturing the plane sitting there stationary with the wheels spinning extremely fast, and it just taking off.

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[–] BananaBro ago 

Assuming the plane starts moving backwards, due to friction in the wheel system exerting a real backwards force on it, the engine pulls the plane through the air along the ground, quickly bleeding off any of the momentum. The instant it starts moving forward, the treadmill is irrelevant. The wheel are free spinning, once the plane removes any backwards motion created by initially being parked on a treadmill, it becomes a regular take-off.

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[–] Egon 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

No. NO no no no no. Not this again. I can't hear you lalalala.

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[–] RedditCEOEllenPao 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Fool of a Took! You've unleashed one of the most monstrous, polarizing debates on the internet!

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[–] 1273413? 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

See this math.stackexchange question for more detailed answers.

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[–] tokamakZero 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Here is a video explaining why 0.999 repeating DOES = 1

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[–] ZebraDanio 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

This just doesn't seem right. My brain refuses to absorb this information. What about the 0.000...1 that gets left behind? I get it that out brains can't comprehend a number so small, but it must exist.

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[–] GlipGlops 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

The ellipses mean the zeros keep going forever, before that last ...1 is reached. There is no ...1.

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[–] ZebraDanio ago  (edited ago)

I didn't mean to use the ellipses as notation. I'm no mathematician. I'm just trying to express what my noodle is churning:

1 =/= 0.999...
1 == 0.999... + (1 / infinity)

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[–] dannyduchamp 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

For people who don't believe this, I've always wanted to know what you think the answer to 1 - 0.999... is

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[–] lucke0204 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

0.000...

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