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[–] elitch2 1 points 24 points (+25|-1) ago 

Yeah, you would typically wake up around 3am, fuck your wife, have a smoke/snack, and sleep until sunup. Cheap artificial light changed all that.

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[–] piratse 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I'm not sold on light causing it. It's more to do with how the work/school schedule became tied to everyone. But I knows theres talking points about both.

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[–] TheKobold 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's never one thing that creates a change its always multiple sources. It was both the requirements of the new jobs and the introduction of artificial lighting, plus who knows what other causes.

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[–] MyDrunkAccount [S] 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

Historical norm:

Historian A. Roger Ekirch has argued that before the Industrial Revolution, interrupted sleep was dominant in Western civilization. He draws evidence from documents from the ancient, medieval, and modern world. Other historians, such as Craig Koslofsky, have endorsed Ekirch's analysis.

According to Ekirch's argument, adults typically slept in two distinct phases, bridged by an intervening period of wakefulness of approximately one hour. This time was used to pray and reflect, and to interpret dreams, which were more vivid at that hour than upon waking in the morning. This was also a favorite time for scholars and poets to write uninterrupted, whereas still others visited neighbors, engaged in sexual activity, or committed petty crime.

The human circadian rhythm regulates the human sleep-wake cycle of wakefulness during the day and sleep at night. Ekirch suggests that it is due to the modern use of electric lighting that most modern humans do not practice interrupted sleep, which is a concern for some writers. Superimposed on this basic rhythm is a secondary one of light sleep in the early afternoon.

The brain exhibits high levels of the pituitary hormone prolactin during the period of nighttime wakefulness, which may contribute to the feeling of peace that many people associate with it.

The modern assumption that consolidated sleep with no awakenings is the normal and correct way for human adults to sleep, may lead people to consult their doctors fearing they have maintenance insomnia or other sleep disorders. If Ekirch's hypothesis is correct, their concerns might best be addressed by reassurance that their sleep conforms to historically natural sleep patterns.

Ekirch has found that the two periods of night sleep were called "first sleep" (occasionally "dead sleep") and "second sleep" (or "morning sleep") in medieval England. He found that first and second sleep were also the terms in the Romance languages, as well as in the language of the Tiv of Nigeria. In French, the common term was premier sommeil or premier somme; in Italian, primo sonno; in Latin, primo somno or concubia nocte. He found no common word in English for the period of wakefulness between, apart from paraphrases such as first waking or when one wakes from his first sleep and the generic watch in its old meaning of being awake. In old French an equivalent generic term is dorveille, a portmanteau of the French words dormir (to sleep) and veiller (to be awake).

Because members of modern industrialised societies, with later evening hours facilitated by electric lighting, mostly do not practice interrupted sleep, Ekirch suggests that they may have misinterpreted and mistranslated references to it in literature. Common modern interpretations of the term first sleep are "beauty sleep" and "early slumber". A reference to first sleep in the Odyssey was translated as "first sleep" in the seventeenth century, but, if Ekirch's hypothesis is correct, was universally mistranslated in the twentieth.

In his 1992 study "In short photoperiods, human sleep is biphasic", Thomas Wehr had eight healthy men confined to a room for fourteen hours of darkness daily for a month. At first the participants slept for about eleven hours, presumably making up for their sleep debt. After this the subjects began to sleep much as people in pre-industrial times had. They would sleep for about four hours, wake up for two to three hours, then go back to bed for another four hours. They also took about two hours to fall asleep.

--wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biphasic_and_polyphasic_sleep#Interrupted_sleep

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[–] vivalad 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

interesting. i usually wake up for a an hour or 2 in the middle of the night, and seeing this, i suspect many others probably do, too.

in younger days, being a good rat, i'd lay there, thinking i had insomnia. then i started thinking, fuck it, i'm awake i may as well do something. i wake up pretty regularly around 2am (from 1st sleep/deep sleep), putter around until 3:30/4 when i catch a few more z's until 6:30. it's a rare night that i sleep straight thru, & usually feel sluggish when i do.

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[–] FuckingInsaneGoat 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I used to feel like that too. I dunno your diet or eating habits but when I started intermittent fasting it changed everything.

I started with a 16/8 split but now most days I do 1 big meal late evening.

It's helped my sleep too. Might be worth a shot.

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[–] DieselBustersYes 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

Hmmm... Wonder if the light bulbs from the industrial revolution screwed with our little caveman brains. :I

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[–] MyDrunkAccount [S] 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

There seem to be two schools of thought: one blames artificial light, while the other says it had to do with long work shifts that were common in the early days of the industrial revolution. It's probably a combination, but I tend to lean towards the latter, because some of the sleep cycles (like the popular siestas in Spain) included a day-time sleep segment.

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[–] Yuke 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yup, working 12-16 hours, usually physical work too; that'll put you to sleep no problem.

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[–] Artofchoke 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

They got us all trained up like good little rats.

It's lonely not to be trained up and engaged in the race, so I can't say which is 'worse'.

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[–] FishsticksForever 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I not sure what it is, but I am sure it's a combination of things which the intelligent ones here can decipher, but I have no problem sleeping 12+ straight, in fact I have slept over 18 hours straight many times, first while ill, and now I can do it if my mind is not in the right place. While I can work 10+ on 4 hours of sleep, if given the leniency I can sleep 18 if wanted. I enjoy sleeping more than most things.

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[–] baneofretail 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

So where's the schedule where you drink until nearly midnight, pass out, wake at 5, work until 10, drink heavily until midnight, then rinse and repeat?

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[–] forgotmypassword-sad 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

stage before you hit AA

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[–] FishsticksForever 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

BTDT, didn't buy the book, drank the coffee, candy is for children.

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[–] Titus-of-Voat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

If you start drinking while you're still at work you won't have to stay up so late.

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[–] baneofretail 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Now you're the problem solver of the group.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] 12218727 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

wtf do you do? Are you super NEETs?

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[–] tanukihat 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Yep, I've heard this before. People would typically wake up, eat something, read or write if they could, and then go back to bed.

Honestly this is my preferred way to do it, but I feel bad because the segments feel like naps to me. I should just commit to segmented sleep.

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