[–] [deleted] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

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[–] Nurdoidz [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I edited the post with clearer bullet points. Is it now what you had in mind?

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

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[–] Nurdoidz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Overpopulation would become a much bigger issue than it already is. If we want to be immortal, we'd all have to stop having children, and some people might not be down with that.

We touched on overpopulation a bit in our conversation, but we didn't really come up with any ideas of solutions. But, when I think about it, this could be plausible. A world suddenly divided by two major groups: those who prefer to reproduce and those who prefer to live longer. I don't know anything about societal structure, so I can't really imagine what sort of problems that could cause. Perhaps the immortal could become targets? Would the immortal then try to anonymize themselves by keeping their immortality a secret? It seems like one would have to relocate every few decades before creating a suspicion.

I think it may depend on how big the groups are. If a bigger portion want children, discrimination could happen and, all of a sudden, we see a segregated society where the immortal have limited rights. Would immortality even be beneficial then?

If a bigger portion want immortality, what would happen? I don't know, maybe I'm victimizing the immortal a bit, but I'm not sure if it would have as big a negative impact as the inverse. Perhaps the idea of having children could be seen as inferior?


If we could hypothetically make everyone immortal with no consequences, then we have the issue of progress. [...] if that transition never happens, then do all societies simply stagnate?

See, I thought it would be the opposite. Greater minds could become immortal and devote more of their time aiding the progress of science. I understand that the average people probably make up a portion of progress just as important, but greater minds would generally speed up progress in a more efficient way.

But, I think I understand what you're saying. The urgency to improve or otherwise make oneself's life better is gone when death isn't as big of a threat as it is now. That directly correlates with progress and may even slow it down, contrary to what I thought above.


One stipulation, I'd rather not be able to feel pain, or be one of those immortals that dies and then revives himself. That'd kind of suck once the sun dies out and I'd have to float through space suffocating and reviving over and over and over again.

I agree. I focused the discussion on pure immortality, as in 'not dying by aging', because I think it's unlikely anyone would really be able to live past five hundred years. This opinion really only stems from that discussion I had with my coworker when he mentioned that he heard someone calculate, by everyday risks of death, how long the average human could really live if immortal. I think it's probably smarter to research myself before forming an opinion, though, so don't discredit me completely. :-)


On a note not mentioned in this comment thread, we also discussed how marriage would work. We both agreed that marriage would probably be redefined and thought of differently than it is today. "Till death do us part", in my opinion, did not account for marriages past sixty or seventy years. People change and I think marriage would be seen mutually as a temporary bonding and a graceful end when they both want to see someone else. I live in a Christian-dominated culture, so I, myself, have to wonder how Christianity would take marriage. Or, more especially, immortality.

Now that I think about it more, immortality could become the biggest change, in terms of culture, biology, science, religion, and evolution, humans have had in history. Sorry, I'm rambling. Thinking about it just raises more questions.

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[–] totallytexan 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

yeah being immortal would be great and all just not so much if i was stuck to a bed and hooked up to a dozen different machines. i could see the 50 year increase possibly happening because of the ever increasing advancements in healthcare. things like genetic makeup will become more understood as to earlier detect various diseases. as far as immortality im really not sure because you would have to somehow keep something like the heart (a pump) from failing. they last a while but for forever, probably not. sorry for the rant tldr: cool idea but not for a while or probably impossible

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[–] Nurdoidz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Good response. I've heard from my coworker a few methods some scientists are working on toward immortality, such as some type of microbot in the bloodstream that cleans the body and keeps it healthy and something about improving how cells function, but I'm not sure about the latter. Personally, I would rather die than rely on some form of limiting machinery that I can't do what I like anymore. Perhaps true immortality is impossible, but I'd be content with a few more decades. As long as it's not too expensive.

Thanks for the response. Don't worry about it being too long; this subverse is great for long responses. But if you want to keep it short, that's okay, too. :-)

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[–] MoeShinola1 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

In fifty years? I doubt it. People are too impatient for the future. You're talking real super-science. Besides, even if it were possible, our level of tech could not support eternal life for the population, so if "they" are keeping it hidden I don't blame them. What a mess that would be if we all knew it was possible, just not for us. We'd blow up the world fighting over it.

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[–] Nurdoidz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I don't believe there is a 'they' hiding something like immortality from us because the odds of only them discovering it, when there are many other labs and great minds throughout the world, are pretty small. But, if 'they' is referring to the scientists or labs themselves, then I think it's possible, just not probable. It kind of reminds me of the anime Steins;Gate, in which, when time travel is theorized to be possible, a 'race' to discover it begins, and all hell would break loose.

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[–] MoeShinola1 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Good point.

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[–] LizardBreathe 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Before I read any other comments, here is my first thoughts:

  1. birth: If we achieve immortality, but continue to give birth to new humans, leads me to

  2. will the extension of human life also extend the span of time humans are fertile*,

  3. Space, wow, we now are going to have a crap ton more humans in a limit environment, which means

  4. What disease will these immortals not be effect by and but the rest of the population does suffer from,

  5. because only the rich will be able to afford to be immortal and there is also a cost to the rest.

Edit: formatting only 2nd edit: see *

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[–] Nurdoidz [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

birth: If we achieve immortality, but continue to give birth to new humans, leads me to [...] will the extension of human life also extend the span of time humans are fertile*,

As ShoGaNai speculated, perhaps, if immortality is possible, those who claim it would not be able to reproduce. Adding on to that, perhaps, with immortality, an irreversible procedure to infertilize the patient/client would become mandatory.

Hm. Maybe it would be possible that underground organizations would illegally give immortality to those also looking to have children? This is pretty interesting.


only the rich will be able to afford to be immortal and there is also a cost to the rest

This was one problem that stuck out to me. As far as I know, almost all new consumer-level discoveries start out expensive, so maybe you're right with only the rich gaining the ability. With the already established stigma of the rich being evil, coupled with people's general selfishness, I think this may cause a war. But how could war be possible if it'd be hard to differenciate the immortal to mortal rich? It's not like you can spot an immortal just by looking at them. That could get messy.

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[–] MrHarryReems 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This was pretty much my thought. Only those who have never reproduced would be eligible for immortality. Someone had mentioned in a previous post about segregation and discrimination against the immortal, but I think it would go the other way. Anyone who willfully created more competition for the limited resources would be a potential target.