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[–] SaveTheChildren 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The first time I want to really make something delish I just look for alton brown's recipe. His recipes can be more technical / time consuming / more steps than some recipes, but if you follow the recipe you are guaranteed AMAZING results.

If I got an ice cream maker I would probably make this first

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/chocolate-ice-cream-recipe/

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[–] Professor_de_la_Paz [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Very cool, although I have to check to see if my machine can make 1 1/2 qts at one go.

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[–] SaveTheChildren 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You could always halve the recipe :)

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[–] wahala 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Oh - so how about a recipe?! LOL

One of my favorite ice cream flavors is coffee. For an easy version, we use Fallon's no-cook vanilla base. To flavor it, we use a few tablespoons of espresso powder. We use Medaglia d’Oro Instant Espresso Coffee , third one down on that page. We prepare a very concentrated water/espresso powder mix and add that to the base before churning.

It comes out really light and creamy. The only drawback is the fact that we usually use the no-cook base, which means no eggs, so if you don't eat it fast it doesn't sit well in the freezer. If you use the cook base or the B&J French Vanilla base, it will hold up longer. But seriously - does coffee ice cream last longer than a day or two in your house? Not mine.

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[–] Professor_de_la_Paz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I've never made coffee ice cream. I've been easing my way into it. Making ice cream is more like baking than I'm used to - it requires following recipes closely. I cook, which means I use recipes as vague guides.

:-D

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[–] wahala 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It definitely is more like baking than cooking. The nice thing about using the no-cook base coffee ice cream is that is it really easy and hard to screw up.

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[–] wahala 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

We were gifted a couple of ice cream making books when we got our maker. The B&J book was one of them. The other was The Best Ice Cream Maker Cookbook Ever, Peggy Fallon

This book isn't the greatest if you're looking to refine your techniques but it does have a lot of great ideas for flavors/add ins, etc. The sorbet section is pretty good too. We made an exquisite blackberry sorbet from berries from our yard last spring. Don't think we're gong to be able to do it again this year - stupid late frost is harming the berry harvest.

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[–] Professor_de_la_Paz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for the recommendation!

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[–] henkan 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

A bit late to the party perhaps, but I've been making ice cream the past couple of years with varying results. Here's one that I think works wonders (partly adapted from a recipe by Grant Achatz):

  • 300g double cream
  • 300g milk
  • 180g whole, roasted coffee beans
  • 50g egg yolks
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 25g glucose
  • 5g locust bean gum

First, let the coffee beans steep in the milk and cream overnight to infuse. Discard the coffee beans afterwards, reserving the liquid.

Heat 500g of the infused liquid over a medium heat to a light simmer. Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks and sugar in a bowl. Incorporate the liquid in the yolk mixture a little at a time. Pour the mixture back into the pot over a medium heat, and let it come to 83 degrees celsius. Remove from the heat, and add the glucose. Using a handheld immersion blender, add the locust bean gum and mix continuously for approximately 10 minutes, until the mixture is smooth and thick. Let cool completely over a bath of ice water, and refrigate until it's churning time.

If you do not have locust bean gum, gelatine is a fine ordinary household substitute. I find the texture to be superior using locust bean gum, however.

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[–] Professor_de_la_Paz [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Who cares if it's late? It sounds like it will be tasty!

Thank you.

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[–] henkan 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

No problemos!

You can of course also switch out the coffee beans for another infusion; the original Achatz' recipe used applewood, which was also delicious, but a bit more "out there" - it also required more liquid since the applewood soaked up more than coffee beans.