[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

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[–] AnalogRocks [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Uhhh I don't remember posting it there so I hope someone didn't post without asking. Haven't been on /p/ in quite awhile.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

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[–] nroslm 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Maybe some sepia, crushing your black and whites, and/or a bit of grain. IF post is allowed on the shot.. Just going by the shot maybe framing a little tighter to play up the historical artefacts like clothing and items on the table. Cool shot all in all tho!

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[–] AnalogRocks [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thanks man! I'm not sure what crushing black/whites means and I did add a bit of grain, but perhaps I should have made it more intense. I like the idea of sepia though I might try that!

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[–] nroslm 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

So crushing would be done on the tone curve in lightroom, or cruves in PS. Basically you are decreasing your own dynamic range, take a look here: https://creativemarket.com/blog/2014/07/14/how-to-achieve-that-crushed-black-film-look-in-photoshop-and-lightroom

As for the noise, I think (maybe) a real fine grain would be nice. If your using photoshop do New Layer > Mode Overlay/Softlight > Check Fill with 50% gray > Filter > Noise > Add Noise > Gaussian + Monochromatic should get you there. I really like that noise all in all, but since I'm not sure how to increase grain size so I still tend to use LR noise when I need grainer images.

Also the more I think about it, the more I remember some of that old B&W stuff was actually pretty dynamic and clean.

Maybe look at something like: https://www.google.com/search?q=photos+from+the+1940 to find the levels that look the most 'natural' for your project.

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[–] innsett 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I think the guy on the table would benefit from some diffused lighting on his face. The shadows there are pretty harsh imo.