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[–] chronicdisco 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Difficulty is not a thing in breast feeding unless some obscure medical conditions afflict the mother. It is not only easy, it is vital for the health of the child. One's bacterial cultures in their digestive tract is seeded by breast feeding, as is their immune system. In fact, breast feeding should go back to a communal activity where pregnant and recently birthed mothers should be feeding eachother's infants to improve the health of their newborns.

The shit talking about breast feeding is a result of insane feminists and the baby formula makers campaigning against it.

Formula leaves children smaller, weaker, sickly, and less emotionally bonded to their mothers... There is no upswing in that equation.

Your tit will be bit, chewed, punched, kneaded... It will be stiff, itchy, drippy, easily irritated... You will have times where you hate it. It isn't as though it were made to be a pleasurable thing, but it is a worthwhile thing.

Labour, that's the hardest part.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm 100% committed to avoiding formula feeding. I don't see any Benefit to throwing my money at a large company for a substandard product When i can make a better version myself.

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[–] Damnpasswords 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

A good portion of the internet exists to give lazy/hedonistic assholes excuses so they don't have to try/improve themselves. They can always find at least one doctor to support something, even if it's not breastfeeding (just look at the immune system benefits), HAES, or getting arms shoved into you.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yeah I get that, I figured this is one more way for people to act like a victim when really just being lazy. Everyone in my family has breast fed without issue so I'm pretty confident about it.

that being said, I'm sure there are some women out there that have legitimate issues that make it harder and I liked to be prepared as possible. But it's hard to separate genuine issues one might encounter with self justifying bullshit.

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[–] Damnpasswords 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

it's hard to separate genuine issues one might encounter with self justifying bullshit.

The modern internet in one sentence

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[–] silverplate 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

For me, breastfeeding was the sweetest, most intimate relationship I've ever experienced. It was wonderful. And relatively easy. The physical benefits to your child are numerous and I think the emotional benefit is essential, too. Where are you reading this? I mean, sure, it's a drag to have to nurse when you're out and about with the baby, maybe? But I can't imagine why a mother would choose not to nurse! We did it for years, ha ha.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm in Australia but a lot of the forums seem to be heavily American.

Regardless of location I believe a lot of the women who choose not to breast feed tend to be very feministic in their leanings. There's a lot of "I just felt like I was losing my identity and becoming nothing more than a vending machine". Which seems absurd to me.

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[–] silverplate 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I feel very sorry for those women. It's the most amazing feeling to look at your growing baby and know that your very own body, that created this tiny being, has the perfect milk just for them. And that that baby is growing and thriving simply from nursing! Yes, your breasts will be pinched and rolled and squashed and they will occasionally hurt and they may get infected. Doesn't matter. It's totally worth it when you look down and that baby grins up at you from around a nipple. I don't know why women don't talk about this more, it's awesome! Can you find a Le Leche League near you or online? Chances are, though, that Nature will do her thing, and your baby will arrive and the two of you will figure it out together. I wish you luck and I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

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[–] lets_get_out_of_here 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

My wife has been breastfeeding for 3 weeks. She went into it with no prior research, books, etc. Totally blind.

It's going well, it took about a week to really go smoothly.

Here are the most important tips I can share based on watching her.

Good latch, good latch, good latch. You'll hear it a lot but it's true. If the baby doesn't latch perfectly, don't say oh well and let it feed. You will develop painful blisters that can open and bleed from the suction (my wife.) Always re latch baby until it's perfect. It's frustrating but you'll thank yourself.

If you end up with one breast out of commission, pump it and feed with the other or it will become engorged / other problems. My wife was actually down a breast because a dozen nurses with good intentions kept showing her how to "sandwich" her breast in the hospital. The result was swelling and a breast which was impossible to feed baby from. She had to pump it often and feed off the other.

Most other tips I can think of are the obvious ones. Don't let baby fall asleep at the bar, etc.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

What the hell is sandwiching?

I've been doing a lot of research from the technical side of things (because I don't really care about the airy fairy neediness of "muh feelings" that is so prevalent when you talk to a lot of women) and not come across the term.

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[–] lets_get_out_of_here 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

You squeeze the breast so that it is sort of shaped like a sandwich and lined up with the child's mouth as though they were eating one.

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[–] Ticklepaws 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'm not OP but thank you for this info!

How do you/how did your wife deal with the blisters?

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[–] MisterWings 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Unless there is a compelling medical reason, breastfeeding is the easiest thing in the world to do compared to delivery, according to Mrs. Wings. Our first child had an issue because she had a tongue tie but it was an easy fix and she did great. Our second took to it like a fish to water. Honestly, having been around a woman who breast fed both children (and we are not done yet), I can say with complete authority that if breastfeeding is a near impossible task without medical issues preventing it, then I wonder how these women rate walking and breathing at the same time.

Honestly, don't worry about it. If you have any trouble there will be a nurse in the maternity ward who will have literally seen it all and has seven children of her own and will coach you if there are any problem. You have nothing to worry about in this field. What you need to worry about is how much you are going to miss sleeping for more than 2 hours at a time for the next few months, and how much of your conversations will revolve around poop. I'm talking discussing color, consistency and volume in great detail to the point of obsession.

Watch out for the blowouts.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Thanks for the reply. I'm thinking it's like people who say they aren't capable of losing weight, it's more they can't be bothered with the uncomfortable aspects of it.

I'm going to a hospital that aggressively pushes breastfeeding so I'm sure I'll get a tonne of help.

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[–] Opieswife 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Breastfeeding was so easy, no instruction needed. My newborn son fussed, I picked him up, he latched right on and immediately relaxed. I heard some women have difficulty and I feel bad for them. For me it was a natural, very easy experience, and so convient. The only time we bottle fed was after I had surgery and was on meds for a few days but we had enough breast milk stored that the baby made an easy transition for those few days.

Proper latch is important but you will feel the difference right away. A good latch doesn’t hurt and results in a good flow of milk.

Regarding pregnancy being one of the hardest things a woman does. I feel fortunate there as well. I loved being pregnant. I did have some preterm labor so was in the hospital a few times and on bed rest but overall the pregnancy itself was a great experience and not difficult, I loved being pregnant. It wa exhausting though, I napped every day which is unusual for me. I have had to cope with more difficult things than being pregnant. Oh and the pain of delivery, ok yes that hurt, I had one with pain meds and one without (the second came so fast there was no time) but I feel like the pain from a recient bad episode of tendinitis was much worse.

Perhaps I have been more fortunate then others but I loved being pregnant and being a mom. Maybe this was due to circumstances, good genes or just that I was ready and it was the right time for me in my life.

Congratulations on the pending birth of your child.

I will give you 2 tips no one shared with me ahead of time... 1) If you get the shakes during delivery, tremors all over that you can’t stop, don’t be scared I was told after the fact it was normal. In the middle of it I didn’t know what was happening and thought something was wrong. 2) The moment the baby is delivered all the pain stops. This I learned on my first delivery and really helped motivate me on the second.

I wish you a lifetime of happiness and lots of tiny hugs and kisses.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for the congratulations, I'm very much looking forward to it. And thanks for the thorough response.

I'm really not too concerned with pain. I've walked around with a broken arm for about two weeks before and while it hurt it's didn't Really stop me so I'm fairly confident in my ability to handle pain. What sort of medication did you use during the one pregnancy? I feel like I'd rather go without. I don't like the idea of anything stronger than gas and air.

I also really feel most of the issues I've had during pregnancy have been the result of working through. Mainly shitty office chairs and the inability to take a nap when required (4 more days and I should be done with it for ever or at least quite a while). I've had a lot of back pain, but I'm very tall so that's pretty much expected.

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[–] Opieswife 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Oh a broken arm does sound painful but we tend to have different tolerances. It sounds like you will do just fine. Be aware of your pain relief choices and don’t be afraid of changing your mind.You know your body and what you can handle.

With the first delivery I had an epidural. That alone was frightening, putting a needle in my spine which was risky on its own. It seemed to dull the pain some making it more manageable. I was fully alert and aware of everything going on so I felt it was a decent choice at the time.

:)

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

So I ended up havinging a premie baby. 34 weeks 5 days emergancy c section and I was told to expect that I ptobably wouldnt be able to exclusively breast feed due to those circumstances. She took to the breast with no issue and prefers it over the bottle the drs keep trying to force on us. No supply issue either. All in all, not the neigh impossible task some women build it up to be.

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[–] middle_path 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

My wife breast fed for 2 months, then pumped/breast fed for another 4 months with my son. The difficulty comes from the baby's personality, breast size, and general no sleep lifestyle that comes with parenting a newborn.

My wife was very educated on breastfeeding and did all kinds of reading on the topic. The first few weeks were very hard for her. She has huge boobs and my son was a lazy eater ( would suckle for like 5 mins then fall asleep on the boob/spill milk everywhere). After a few weeks they got a better rhythm going, but it wasn't a walk in the park. There were easy days and hard ones. It can be a very frustrating process and extremely emotional for a new mother with a cocktail of hormones running through her body.

She did enjoy it all around. It made her feel like a more complete woman and good mother. But was it easy, no. Was it the most difficult thing she's done, no.

That being said, if we have another one she's willing to do it again.

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[–] Anmanda [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thanks for the response. Did your son receive still receive breastmilk exclusively when she pumped?

I would be willing to compromise to that but really don't want to formula feed.

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[–] middle_path 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

We did 95% breast milk for 6 months. That was my wife's goal and in my opinion, she nailed it. There were times toward the end where she wasn't producing as much (generally production goes down with a pump instead of a child) so we had to supplement a bottle of formula here and there. Then there was another 6 months or so of formula until we got him totally on solid food.

Formula isn't the devil, but it's no ideal. with both of us working full time jobs, only breast feeding was not an option once she went back to work. The first few months (the hospital will tell you 3 weeks) is keen for breast milk just to get those awesome antibodies.

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