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[–] RAMASULE 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

shit

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[–] pyres 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How bad is it really? In a Project Sonar, Rapid7 Labs reports finding more than 104,000 internet-exposed endpoints that appear to be running vulnerable versions of Samba on port 445. "Of those, almost 90 percent (92,570) are running versions for which there is currently no direct patch available."
If you're running Samba on a Linux or Unix server, you need to patch it now. If you're running a version of Samba that isn't patched yet, upgrade it to a newer, patched edition as soon as possible. If for some reason you can't do that either, you must edit your smb.conf file. This is the Samba server's master configuration file.
To do that, add the parameter:
nt pipe support = no
to the [global] section of your smb.conf and restart smbd, the Samba daemon. This prevents clients from accessing any named pipe endpoints and thus making use of the hole. Unfortunately, resetting this parameter may also impact how Windows clients access files and directories on a Samba-based shared drive.
How exactly? Good question. We don't know yet. Isn't that fun?

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[–] ElDulce 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How bad is it really? In a Project Sonar, Rapid7 Labs reports finding more than 104,000 internet-exposed endpoints that appear to be running vulnerable versions of Samba on port 445. "Of those, almost 90 percent (92,570) are running versions for which there is currently no direct patch available." If you're running Samba on a Linux or Unix server, you need to patch it now. If you're running a version of Samba that isn't patched yet, upgrade it to a newer, patched edition as soon as possible. If for some reason you can't do that either, you must edit your smb.conf file. This is the Samba server's master configuration file. To do that, add the parameter: nt pipe support = no to the [global] section of your smb.conf and restart smbd, the Samba daemon. This prevents clients from accessing any named pipe endpoints and thus making use of the hole. Unfortunately, resetting this parameter may also impact how Windows clients access files and directories on a Samba-based shared drive. How exactly? Good question. We don't know yet. Isn't that fun?