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[–] Waiyu_Dudat 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I can't ID it either, but are those fruit flies on it?

Bugs and mushrooms interact more than we realize, imo. (Everything interacts more than we realize, but bugs, specifically bees, and mushrooms have a special connection).

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[–] Dismal_Swamp [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Yes, those are fruit flies. This mushroom was fruiting on the other side of the tree and it was covered in fruit flies. This picture was of the newest fruit so the fruit flies just started eating it. The tree is half dead. Natures symbiotic garbage disposal at work. Mushrooms eat the tree, flies eat the mushrooms, birds eat the flies and then fly off and poop seeds on the ground..... cycles of life.

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[–] Waiyu_Dudat 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Permaculture and Paul Stamets rocked my world last winter. Insanely eye opening to see how deeply everything interacts and how special mycelium are. I bet the fruit flies get disease resistance from that mushroom. Bees do that.

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[–] 10602115? 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Looks like some variety of hedgehog mushroom/lionsmane.

They're edible but get a solid ID before consuming. Hedgehogs are gourmet after you scrape off the spore tubes.

edit: https://www.google.com/search?q=Hericium&client=ms-android-verizon&prmd=sinv&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjn19e-s7_WAhXI0iYKHVWUCHwQ_AUIEigC&biw=360&bih=560

Most likely a Hericium (hedgehog, lions main, bear tooth, etc.)

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[–] Dismal_Swamp [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks. The fruit flies got to them first so I'm not gonna be eating these. The spore tubes look like a waterfall.