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[–] MrBunnyVest 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Everything loststoic said is dead on. I started at 30 , recovering from an accident that destroyed my arm. Best thing I ever did. Take your time, find a good school, and once there, don't give up.

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[–] loststoic 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I started at 17, quit. Started back up at 20, quit. Started back up at 25, quit. Started back up at 30, quit. Started back up at 35, quit. Now I am 41 and just started back up again. Always the same. Hard at first, but always worth it.

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[–] Prostheticwiener [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How were your classes? Were you one of the older people in the classes? Was there a good age mixture?

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[–] loststoic 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I have never been the youngest, and I have never been the oldest, even now. Most of the time the classes are filled with guys in their teens into 30s. It depends on the martial arts and the school. BJJ pulls in more of the young fighters and meat heads. TKD has an in with the soccer moms so it gets all the little kids. Kung Fu can be a mixed bag. Depends on the teacher. Some Kung Fu studios are run like a fight school so they get the young kids. But the allure of 'ancient shaolin secrets' brings some older people. Some Kung Fu schools is like being part of a family where mom and dad learn along side with little Susie Kick Ass and Bobby Brusier. Aikido brings in your Hippies that believe that it is the peaceful way to resolve conflict. It also appeals to woman, but rough enough to draw the attention of some strange people. Ninjitsu or ninpo brings in a younger crowd in my experience. But it all really depends on the instructor. Allways consider two things when you pick a martial art 1) The instructor 2) The style. Hell even a TKD guy made it in the UFC.

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[–] emrcickray 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Just got back from camping, you sond like krav maga or dog brothers like stuff (can't remember the exact name of their style) would fit your needs. It will be mostly abult and be a mix of grappling and striking. I would stay clear of mma stuff as I have seen new guys just get used as chew toys. BBJ is good but is light on striking.

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[–] Prostheticwiener [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Hmm that sounds interesting. Sorry I never got back to you from earlier I've been having car problems so that has taken up all my time lately

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[–] emrcickray 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sorry, to hear your ride is busted. Love to hear what you go with and your experience getting into it. Two things to remember, your the one paying to be there and are the one really in charge, and no matter how they try to make it sound like their school or instructors are the best all us instructors are a dime a dozen and if your not happy and having fun try a nother school.

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[–] fantasticraig 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I started in my 20s, I actually ended up being one of the younger people in the class. I'd say just check it out, most schools let you take a free class to see if you'd like it.

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[–] GoddammitMrNoodle 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I started in my 40s. Had a great time and got in the best shape of my life. Got tired of getting my ass handed to me by teenagers on a regular basis though and stopped after getting a BB. Highly recommended. Full disclosure I did Judo as a kid and Tai Chi in my 20s, not that I got very skilled at either but they did act as ice breakers.

LSS: 20s is not too old to start.

A word of warning: Many (most?) MA schools are belt farms. It's about the only way to make any money and regardless of how noble the founder's intentions are when they start out, inevitably it becomes a numbers game driven by cheap labor (senior students do a lot of the teaching). There's nothing wrong with this per se however there are some really really horrible schools out there. Until you learn some good technique you really have no way to judge, so I always recommend that you find someone who's been doing MA for a while and ask them to accompany you to the schools you're considering. My acid test is the Turning Kick. Seems simple but proper execution is something that needs to be taught correctly until it becomes second nature. In my experience none of the Dojos that spring up at the malls teach this kick correctly (I'm looking at you Sung Lee). What is more the students are generally on a schedule of belt testing that is followed rigorously regardless of skills acquired. 14 YOs with BBs teaching class is NOT a sign that the school is better or even good. And did I mention that they charge for belt testing?

The more flamboyant, out spoken, and dismissive of other clubs and styles the founder is is also a good indication of a belt farm. These guys are good at promoting themselves first, everything else is secondary.

Don't let my comments put you off. It's a great time and you will meet some truly talented and inspiring people. Just keep eyes open going in. And don't hesitate to change schools if you begin to have doubts.

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[–] Prostheticwiener [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for the advice maybe I'll give it a shot!

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[–] emrcickray 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I started when I was 15 and 40 now my main gig has been jujitsu but did karate, judo, kun-fu, akido, boxing and wrestling, ok got that out. I would say first what is your idea of "martial arts" it means alot of different things to different poeple. With the amount of variety out there it is hard to nail down what advice to give to you without knowing what you are expecting out of it. So, give us your list of expectations and fears and we the internets can better help you. But to cut to the chase 20 is a fine to start just need to nail down where to get you started. Oh, your location will also be needed becouse we can tell you hopkido is best for you but if their is no classes in your town it's useless advice.

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[–] Prostheticwiener [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I guess I don't know enough about the different styles to say what I'm truly interested in. I like the idea of feeling like I get a decent workout without having to be in a gym environment. I also have started to feel a little lost as I'm getting ready to graduate college and still don't feel like I know who I really am so maybe trying something new will help with that.

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[–] snowman 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I did MA as a kid, stopped, then took it up in my early 20's again, and have been training on and off ever since.

If you want a good workout, either boxing, Muay Thai, or BJJ is the best bet, you can train and don't have to be a "fighter" will be heaps of people in the same boat, ie they want to stay fit, learn some skills etc, best thing you can do is try out some classes and make your choice from there.

Best thing I found about training is it allows you to shift your focus off your day to day and zero in on specific things for that session, clears the mind with a healthy dose of sweat

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[–] emrcickray 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You don't need to know anything about the different styles out there thats our job. Just need to know things like do you like hitting or grappling, want a strict asian dojo experence or an experience more like the rocky movie, favorite action movie fight scene, what to be a ninja or mma star, want to learn from Mr. Meogi or Tyler Durham. So I am going to be out for a few days and may not get back to you untell Tuesday please don't feel like I am blowing you off just out camping.

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[–] parcelsus 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I got serious about martial arts at about 22. I've trained in 2 different schools. In both places, my fellow students were adults. One of my former classmates was even an FBI agent.

If you're too embarassed to train at a place where the kids are way more experienced, you can find a place where most or all students are adults. On the other hand, I know I wouldn't pass up a good school just because there are people who are younger and better at the art. You'll find people who are younger and better than you in any aspect of your life if you look.

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[–] 123_456 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

They have adult classes. When I went to a BJJ class there was a guy there who at least 40. Most people were in their 30s, and late 20s.