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[–] Dumptruck [S] 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

There are clean install .iso's for arch and manjaro. Anyone tried these? Is the hate for systemd this strong?

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[–] lord_nougat 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Wow, I have not even looked into it, but I've just been not installing anything newer than Ubuntu 14.04 and Centos 6 to avoid systemd. I figure I'll have to deal with it eventually, but I'd rather not if I don't have to.

Heck, I've been considering going back to FreeBSD, partly to avoid the D.

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[–] Troll 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I did. Manjaro OpenRC works with no issues, and I love it. I even installed it for a friend of mine, kek. Look here: https://voat.co/v/technology/comments/936557

But I have to make a disclaimer. I'm not an anti-systemd guy. I think systemd is largely successful because it simplifies a shitton of work around scripts and I honestly don't give a shit about POSIX compliance anymore. POSIX was designed when 128 people had to share 2MB or RAM.

Also, there is this thing that I mainly do shit in C (as I truly hate C++ and think it's shit language) and I have no problem reading it. Systemd is by every Stallman's definition a piece of free software.

So why am I not using it, you may ask yourself? Why do I run Gentoo on my desktop and Manjaro OpenRC on my laptop if I'm not against systemd philosophy? Because Lennart Poettering and Kay Sievers can't code for shit. Just you wait for their implementation of the su into systemd via machinectl and watch those privilege escalations pop up left and right. But systemd does make a lot of things easier for distro maintainers and that's the main reason people are adopting it en masse. Because they're fucking lazy.

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[–] forgetmyname 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

When all you have is systemd superglue, every utility, interface has cracks in it?

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[–] aaronC 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

After trying to recover another Linux install via a chroot, yes, systemd deserves the hate it gets. On a systemd system, when you chroot to fix something, several things are not possible without shims or additional programs. For example, you can't enable or disable services on a systemd system from a chroot without some other tool, something you can do trivially on non-systemd systems.

It's just like everything else Poettering makes. It has features that sound nice on paper, gives you a few convenient and nice things to work with. And it breaks other parts of the system, has all sorts of problems, and invades everything and ends up a dependency somehow.

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[–] Stinkieroldgoat 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I wish I could find a clear answer for why people hate systemd, beyond "it does too much!"

That said, the distribution I use does not have it, and I'll have to think long and hard when time comes to upgrade because systemd is the norm now in it

[–] [deleted] 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] effusive_ermine 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That coupled with the myth that Linux

Care to elaborate on this?

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[–] lbruiser 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Wasn't there a project called uselessd which alwas basicly WINE for systemd calls?

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[–] c23 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The Wikipedia article confirms what you are saying. Its a very interesting read. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systemd

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[–] stradian 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The statement mentions “traditional UNIX principles” which systemd would not adhere to. If you look at how traditional Unixes such as Solaris or BSD are architectured, they are very similar to systemd, actually: a large set of small utilities, each one with a defined purpose, but which are absolutely not interchangeable or replaceable.

https://wiki.debian.org/Debate/initsystem/systemd#Sysvinit_.2B-_OpenRC

Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly.

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[–] BobBelcher 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

My understanding was that Linux Mint 17.x does not use systemd while 18.x will. Am I mistaken about that?

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[–] Disappointed 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

That's right because Mint s based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Ubuntu has gone with Systemd for 16.04 LTS and Mint will just follow that with their next releases.

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[–] Drenki 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm not so sure about that. The Mint team has said that they eventually want to migrate away from Ubuntu and instead build directly off of Debian or something else.

I don't think they take an anti-systemd stance, though I want them to.

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[–] Drenki 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I believe off a default install, parts of systemd are present. I remember seeing stuff when I went looking though I don't know if it was actively being used or not.