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[–] sakuramboo 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Here is a pro tip.

Put /home on it's own drive. This way, you can install any distro you want, don't format /home and reuse it. All your configs won't get touched and all your data will still be there.

If you really want to get serious, make /home an LVM so if you run out of space you can just put another drive in, add it to the LVM and you are done.

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[–] CujoQuarrel 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

With HDs so large anymore it's very unusual to run out of space for Home.

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[–] sakuramboo 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Especially when you attach them together.

It's gonna be a while until I fill up my 10TB /home.

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[–] fortuitouslyunfallen [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Serious? Thanks, that's a pretty great tip.

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[–] RebelPride 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It is, isn't it? Welcome to the world that actually makes sense! There's no part of your computer that is off limits to you now, you can bend and mold it to be and work in any way you can imagine. My current projects include finally switching from vim to emacs, and trying to set up a gpu passthrough to run any game/program straight from linux without dual booting. (have to use wangblows sometimes for inventor and such for work.)

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] jamesed 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Adding a disk drive to a Logical volume is a simple process and it relatively easy. However a caveat If you are using RAID 0 (also known a striping) if you loose a drive you loose everything as all your files are spread across all the drives. With RAID 0 if you loose a drive you need to do a complete re-install of the OS as well as RESTORE your file system from a backup (if you have one).

If you Use RAID 1 (mirroring) if you loose a drive you have the clone of the information on the partner drive and you can still access it. Of course with RAID 1 if you need to expand your file system you will need to add two identical hard drives to maintain the mirrored set.

To get the best of both RAID 0 and RAID 1 you need to implement a RAID 5 or a super redundant RAID 6 scheme. With RAID 5 you can loose one drive, and with a RAID 6 you can lose two drives and still have a functional file system. Of course you need to have one more drive than the size of your file system for a RAID 5 and two extra drives for a RAID 6 to take care of the check summing to recreate the data on the lost drive. So for a 15 TB RAID 5 file system you will need to have 6 three TB (18 TB of drives.)

With RAID 5 or RAID 6 you can have the RAID implemented via Software or Hardware. On a software RAID 5 or RAID 6 you have to have Drive mapping on a non RAID 5 disk or in modern systems on the mother board. When you loose the Mother board or RAID 5/6 mapping file you are S-O-L. The solution to this is Hard ware RAID. I use the Rocket RAID 2720 SATA RAID adapter for this. Here is a true series of events that happened to me. I have a unattended server for remote device back up. It lost it's fans and the RAID card literally exploded, (the mother board died also, as well as a stick of Memroy) I was really pissed as I thought that I had lost everything. The OS was Gone, as well as the backup files of the other computers, tablets and cell phones in the house, (4 desktop computers, three laptop computers, two Kindle fires, and two cell phones) I ordered a new Rocket RAID 2720 card, a Motherboard and a replacement stick of memory, When I fired the new system to begin restoring what i could (mainly the OS as all the back up files I ASSUMED WERE TOAST). The Rocket Raid Card scanned the drives found the existing configured RAID 5 system, (The Rocket RAID card is the first thing that boots when power is applied. It boots even before the BIOS is loaded) To make a long story short the whole file system was there, intact and accessible

That is why I am a believer in a HARDWARE raid adapter. You can loose every thing an it is still there. To expand a RAID 5 system you just add another drive to the string and the RAID Adapter takes care of the whole thing. You don't have to do anything. If you loose a drive you just replace the drive and the RAID 5 gets rebuild automatically in the back ground. (I use hot swap trays so I don't even have to open up the system to replace the disk drives. My case has 6 external disk drive bays which I have loaded with 6 three TB drives in a RAID 5 configuration). Oh by the way the Rocket RAID adapter runs about $160 on Newegg.

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[–] sakuramboo 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Either, you decide.

when you use lvcreate you can specify --type with a raid type or treat it like a jbod.

As long as you monitor the life of your drives, running it as a jbod is fine. If you start to see a drive degrade, attach another volume and sync the PV to the new drive.

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[–] GIIOST 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

neat. I am going to try to make the switch as well. I have plenty of free time and want to be a sys admin someday sooo. i'm old enough to remember dos. Okay so simple question, what is your favorite flavor for a noob to use? this user just said ubunto. is that what I should use?

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[–] fortuitouslyunfallen [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I would say go with either Ubuntu or Mint. Ubuntu simply because I think it the most popular and has tons of support. You can almost be guaranteed that if you search a question or error, someone else has asked it before. That's been my experience so far. Mint is also worth considering because it's fairly noob friendly.