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[–] xXx_yolo-swagbl4ze_x 1 points 22 points (+23|-1) ago 

Arch so people who sit behind me in class think I'm a hacker

I'm actually just trying to figure out how to use it

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[–] chrzan 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Same here! I'm so fancy I have a bootable flash drive with arch that I can pull out and use on any computer. After running a custom perl script to connect to wifi, I can startx into my awesome window manager and then use ALL the keyboard shortcuts for extra hacker points.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

At least you got it installed. :\

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[–] kevashcraft 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Are you stuck at the bootloader? It took me a bit to understand grub and even longer to get an efi install working.

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[–] kruug 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

Personally, I stick with Debian. It's what I'm most used to. I've used Ubuntu and didn't like where Canonical went with it, I've tried Arch and gave up after my system broke for the 5th time, and I'm dabbling in Slackware again after being away for a few years (actually about a decade).

I've actually installed VRMS on my Debian install and make sure I it always comes back clean. It's running in a VM, so I don't have to worry too much about non-FOSS drivers and such.

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

If you don't mind me asking, what don't you like about Ubuntu in terms of Canonical, etc. I'm not a fan of the Amazon web search biz, but you can opt out in the options. Other than that, I kinda like Unity, but it's a little heavy for my needs. I like Debian, but I always end up trying to add a bunch of stuff that Ubuntu has stock already, so that's how I ended up staying in the Ubuntu family.

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[–] kruug 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

It's mainly the mentality they have regarding upstream. They've taken Debian, changed everything to their liking, fixed issues that they've found, and then...that's it. They don't really contribute their fixes back up to Debian and up further to other sources.

It's all political stuff for me. There's nothing (aside from the Amazon fiasco) that Ubuntu does wrong as an OS (well, unless you count the static toolbar that appears on EVERY monitor) that can't be changed with a config somewhere.

It also irritates me when developers target Ubuntu. It's a modified version of Debian, which means that it's not guaranteed to work on Debian if it was developed for Ubuntu or any of the Ubuntu derivatives. If they were to target Debian as a development platform, it could be shared between all Linux environments, not just Ubuntu and its derivatives.

Like I said earlier, my gripes are mainly political gripes.

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[–] Xiffth 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Mint.

Yes I am a noob :(

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[–] GoddammitMrNoodle 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Noob or not, Mint is the best desktop experience so far IMO.

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[–] Xiffth 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Yes I agree.

Mint is tied with Antergos for me so far, with Antix at a far third. I really like them because of their great package support and reliability of the desktop.

I really really like cinnamon 2.6. Its so fragging polished its nuts. Clem deserves some real props.

I usually recommend Mint because of it's "safeness"

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[–] vornth 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Absolutely nothing wrong with that, noob or experienced. If that's the distribution that works the best for your needs then why switch (other than just to play around)?

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[–] gtcom 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Have you tried Elementary OS? It's pretty slick.

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[–] rusco 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I second this. Great looking distro.

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Nothing wrong with going Mint. It's as good of a starting point as any. :)

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[–] flopper 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Gentoo for me. Honestly, I think I love it because it's what I learned first. Which is cool, because Gentoo makes you learn Linux in order to install it.

That and near-infinite customization of all aspects of the system. It's easy to maintain my laptop with exactly what I need and nothing I don't, which saves battery life, memory, etc.

Finally, it's trivial to limit the package manager to only free software and deblobbed kernels.

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

That was what they were teaching with in a computer science class. You get to learn your system inside and out.

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[–] flopper 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Yeah, honestly, I'm glad it was my first distro for that reason. The install guide for gentoo is basically a crash course in Linux system administration.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I actually rather like bone-stock Ubuntu with Unity, but a lot of the systems I'm running Linux on are slower or older, so I need something lighter than Windows. Unity just doesn't cut enough of the resource usage. Xfce/LXDE, however... :)

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[–] gtcom 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

I was a pretty consistent Debian user for about 10 years or so. I abandoned ship when they adopted systemd.

I'm running Slackware now. I've considered trying one of the BSD's, but never got around to it.

I avoid any RPM-based distro like the plague. RPM can suck a dick and die.

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[–] algidum 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Very similar story for me except change Slackware for Funtoo. Probably the worst name of all distros but so far I like it very much.

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I didn't like Fedora. I don't know that it was Fedora so much as GNOME 3. Not at all a fan. Everything feels so disorganized.

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[–] kendamagendale 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I like Arch a lot, mostly because I'm addicted to i3.

I am running mint on my laptop. It's OK.

I just tried Ubuntu for the first time in years and I think it's awful.

I'd like to try Slackware and Gentoo.

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[–] gtcom 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Don't let the other kids scare you into thinking Slackware is some bogeyman.

The installer is easy to follow. You will have to partition your disks yourself, but that's the worst part (and it's not even that hard).

Just install everything. The installer will give you a choice to pick which desktop you want to run. Slack favors KDE and it's a safe choice. You can pick something else or finish the installation, download a WM you want and install that.

It's not that hard and it's not a bunch of endless compiling coughgentoocough.

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[–] kendamagendale 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Sweet. I'm used to Arch install, so I'm not worried.

So I could use i3 with slackware, right?

I like that slackware doesn't use systemd, but I don't really understand the nuances of that debate. I'm just suspicious of everything that anyone else is suspicious of.

I didn't know that it was referencing the church of slack until just now, which I love.

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[–] BunyipMoan 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I use Slackware for my servers and my desktops. When I had laptops, I used Slackware with my laptops. I'm comfortable with it as I've been using it since 1995, but it isn't for everyone. I would guess it would depend on what you are expecting from a Linux distro. Slackware really does it for me.

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[–] kendamagendale 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

What do you like about it, if you don't mind me asking?

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[–] kevashcraft 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

i3 is amazing! I get lost in anything else now trying to find a window and remembering to click to focus.

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Unity is hit or miss with people. Personally, I like it. What I don't like is that I put Linux on older and slower computers, and while Ubuntu (in Unity) does run better than Windows 7, it's still not as light on resources as I'd like for those machines.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] snakepaws [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

My only experience with Void was VoidBang. I'm kinda disappointed Crunchbang was discontinued (aside from the new community version being worked on). I might have to do a VirtualBox install of Void and fool around a bit.

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