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[–] getoutofbed 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'm not a veteran by any means, but I use google. Well, duckduckgo acctually. Whenever I don't know anything, I "google" it. I doubt there's a "linux bible" out there.

Just continue as you're doing (googling whenever you need something) and you'll be fine. You could also watch some youtube videos on how to use the terminal. It might be handy to learn the very basics, such as change directory and all that. But ya, again, "google" it.

If you've specific questions, ask away, either here or /v/mint or www.ubuntuforums.org or www.askubuntu.com.

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[–] youvegotmoxie 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

There is a Linux Bible. I got it as a hand-me-down from my dad when I was young and he saw I had an interest in computers. The book is super old but the information is still very relevant.

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[–] chrzan 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

The easiest way to get around the command line is just googling the sorts of things you need to do and trying to understand what the command is actually doing. Use -h, --help, or man to get additional info about commands. Eventually the most common commands will become natural, and you'll also get used to figuring out how to use never- or rarely-used ones.

Also, here's a link that was recently shared on /r/programming that might guide you in deciding what things you should be learning about.

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[–] chobo 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I can recommend the "Linux Command Line" it's a free PDF you can download and check out. You can work through it chapter by chapter and learn more that way. The Linux Command Line

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[–] BASH_SCRIPTS_FOR_YOU 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Got some scripts to download porn with you can study.

http://pastebin.com/Ertmp7uZ

http://pastebin.com/hWCR53Nb

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[–] sodaphish 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

This might sound like a lot of whooey, but I actually do read through the man pages in sections 1 and 8 on an annual basis -- I may not read them thoroughly, but I certainly do read at least the purpose and major options. You can get a list of the man pages in a section by listing the contents of /usr/share/man/man1 and /usr/share/man/man8.

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[–] ThomasJefferson 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I am here because of recent Windows 10 news (https://voat.co/v/technology/comments/144723). I imagine/hope that more people will be coming here too. Anyone have any recommendations for someone who is an engineering student that needs to use a lot of school chosen programs.

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[–] farmer- [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

use the programs that your school chooses until you arent in school anymore! dont sacrifice grades just because you want to switch to linux right now instead of waiting til you graduate

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[–] Ectopod 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

As far as getting started, the Ubuntu community doc on using the terminal is a nice introduction.

Once you're more advanced, Harley Hahn's 'Guide to Unix and Linux' is a good read, and it covers the command line in a way that I thought was helpful, thorough and well organized.

Outside of that, like others have said, you can't go wrong with search engines. Although some things (like pipes '|' ) can be annoying to look up if you don't know the name of the symbol.

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[–] blind-science 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

edX have a free Introduction to Linux course: https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-linux-linuxfoundationx-lfs101x-2

I usually google and end up on the ubuntu forums.

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