0
7

[–] jokersmild 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Plant that stuff in a box or you will have a forest.

1
3

[–] 475677 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

The last house I lived at had bamboo and it's damn near impossible to remove unless you dig it up by the roots and poison the soil once you're done.

0
2

[–] NewWorld 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Warning fellow goats, don't plant that stuff unless you enjoy doing yard work every single day because it's going to take over the entirety of your property. It's a nightmare. But if you know what you're doing or are up for the challenge, it can be pretty fun and nice to look at.

0
2

[–] crimsonchinny 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Can confirm. Bought property that had bamboo, tore up the concrete around it, bamboo spread in a week. Then spent an entire week chopping and setting it to burn to lay ground.

0
2

[–] superkuh [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Not pictured are days 6 through 8 where it grew about 4x as tall as it did in all the days 1 through 5. This is Phyllostachys atrovaginata which is pretty cold tolerant so even if I leave it out in the snow for a few days in fall it's still okay. This is year 4 of this plant. Each year I cut off the shoots just above soil then store in dormant over winter in a cold room. In spring it'll pop up again.

Or it'll just pop up in mid-Feb because of a warm front and then I'll have to keep it alive in my bathroom with 6000 lumens of cfl lights as seen here. Usually I can put it outside again by mid-May.

edit: For those concerned: in some climates it's pretty invasive but here the frost line goes down 2 meters and it's -30C for weeks at a time in winter. I tried planting some in soil but winter killed it. For warm regions it's easy enough to grow in pots or fabric grow bags.

0
1

[–] Tsilent_Tsunami 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

This is how it starts...

Was going to say more, then ended up saying so much I put it here: https://voat.co/v/JustGrowIt/2466541, and below.


There are ~1200 varieties of bamboo. Bamboo spreads from less than 1 inch per year, to 6 feet or more per year, generally known as clumping and spreading types, with some "loose-clumpers" and "slow-spreaders" in the middle. Height ranges from 6 inches to 100 feet plus. Some types are very tropical and can't take cold weather, other types survive -20 F temps.

Bamboo rhizomes grow and spread in the top 1 - 18 inches of the ground. Smaller types have pencil lead thickness, while the larger types can have rhizomes inches in diameter. Rhizomes send out roots to gather nutrients, and also send up the shoots (culms) we see above ground, and know as "bamboo". Takes about 3 - 5 years for a newly planted bamboo to get 'established', and form enough of a rhizome base to begin sending up larger culms. Might take 10 - 15 years before the timber bamboos begin sending up those impressive 5 or 7 inch monsters. (in the tropics, up to 10 or 12 inches)

It's those larger and/or more vigorously spreading types that get people into trouble when planted near a foundation or fence line. Just don't plant a fast spreader near an area you don't want it, without an effectively installed bamboo barrier. The larger, spreading giant timber bamboos should be planted elsewhere. Installing bamboo barrier

A number of bamboo types send up new shoots (culms) in the spring, and the bigger it is, the more impressive. Watching a 6 inch diameter shoot emerge from the ground and be taller than you in a few days is one of the great joys of bamboo growing. If you have the land, a bamboo grove is a pretty cool thing to have. Also pretty cool if you just have a backyard, or even just large pots.

Container Growing: Don't have land, or a giant backyard, and still want a very large bamboo? I've found that the ideal large bamboo container is bamboo barrier above ground, like an above ground swimming pool, but with dirt and bamboo. 24 inch is usually deep enough. A 30 inch diameter will give you a pretty good base for most bamboos. Put barrier under it to prevent escape by the spreading types. Will need to be watered very frequently once they get established. Stronger or spreading types will out-grow the container at some point. With barrier, you can see the rhizomes snaking around the inside like veins. Open your fasteners on the barrier and cut those back a few inches.

My largest surface container was for a Phyllostachys vivax, and was an oval 24" h x 8' x 12'. Had some good 3" canes in that one after 7 years or so.

Flowering: Bamboo species do flower, but their flowering schedules range from about 20 to 120 years. When a species flowers, all existing bamboos of that species over the whole world flower at the same time, over a year or so, then 99%+ of them die. And yes, there are seeds. And mutations for bamboo enthusiasts to enthuse over.

Colors: Did I mention colors? Blue, black, green, yellow, red, and a number of different patterns.

To begin (or feed) your bamboo addiction, check the links below and search "bamboo nursery near me" for local growers and pics. It starts small, just one plant to "see how it goes" after you visit a bamboo garden. Then, you have 40 or 50 different types and are still actively looking for this one I really have to have.

http://www.bamboo.org/index.php (American Bamboo Society)

http://www.bambooweb.info/SearchBambooPlants.php

Search: bamboo nursery near me

Happy Growing!

0
1

[–] middle_path 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Wow! Always wanted to grow this, but didn't feel like containing it or dealing with it growing into a grass forest.

0
1

[–] Thisismyvoatusername 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Alternate view. Bamboo is a pain n the ass to grow because it grows so fast. We have bamboo, but it needs a lot of supervision to not take over.

0
0

[–] Olbee 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Have you considered Willow as an alternative? Easier to maintain, fast growing and you can shape it into interesting Wigloo structures?! Also, can be used as heating fuel if you want to try self-sustainability.

load more comments ▼ (3 remaining)