[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I disagree somewhat. Spectrum disorders aren't really a pathologization of normal people - although I'd say any diagnosis of mild autism spectrum disorder is, as well as things like oppositional defiant disorder. However, psychiatry is certainly in a disgusting state at the moment. It substitutes medicine and hospitalization for the empathy that many people need.

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[–] CrazyDaisy 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I agree. I was diagnosed with autism when I was a kid, but I don't really think that label has been helpful. I wish I didn't have that label because it made people treat me differently and deny me opportunities. Now I simply avoid telling people. No one needs to know. Things are going better.

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[–] obscure 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Often it is. Pathologizing can be a coded way of making value judgments which sound like science. But sometimes people need help. Unfortunately, a lot of the helpers have different agendas.

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[–] Sticky 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

why did you refuse the treatment? is it normal to be cured like that? and whats was your doctors reaction?

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I refused treatment because the research I had done on antipsychotics indicated that while they could be effective in the short term, they were often accompanied by debilitating and sometimes permanent side effects (such as tardive dyskinesia) including, in some cases, a fatal side effect known as neuroleptic maligant syndrome. Further and most importantly, in the long term, antipsychotics usually make the problem worse. I did try an at-the-time new antipsychotic called Latuda at my doctor's request, but within about an hour of taking it I became suicidally dysphoric. I returned the rest of the Latuda sample I had received to my doctor and told him that I was unwilling to try any other antipsychotics. He essentially told me to come back when I changed my mind. I didn't. It was not hard to see that he had no interest whatsoever in my well-being.

It isn't normal for schizophrenia to spontaneously disappear, no. It is usually a chronic illness. I have, however, met two other people who have spontaneously recovered from psychosis if not schizophreniform disorders.

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[–] PickleMeTimbers 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

How did you handle you're...moments for lack of a better word...sans medication? Were there ever times you felt unsafe or regretted your decision (in that moment)? What helped you?

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I didn't really handle them; they were completely unmitigated. I was simply fortunate enough to never be caught in a situation where people would be made acutely aware that something was wrong. At work, for example, I was able to slip away to a place where I could be alone for an hour or two without anyone being the wiser.

I felt unsafe often. The delusion I experienced was that a group of supernatural entities (the watchers) were out to kill me. I was always looking over my shoulder or picking up on their influencing others' actions. I would sometimes have bouts where I felt that it was the end and they were coming to get me right then and there.

I never regretted not taking medicine. If I had, it is very likely that I would still be reliant on it to maintain a normal life even to this day.

What helped me the most was being able to be open up to my group of friends about it so that I could talk about what was going on instead of always having to worry that they were going to find out. After I began experiencing delusions I mostly stopped talking about it, though. At that point what helped was watching Nichijou, because something about Nichijou made everything seem okay for a while.

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[–] Psychorase 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

What do you think of the claim that 75% of people on the schizophrenia spectrum spontaneously recover? I've seen it around in anti-psychiatry contexts, but rarely a whisper of it otherwise. It quite fascinates me, as someone who occupies some undiagnosed spot on that spectrum and has a deep distrust of antipsychotics and the current social stigma around psychosis.

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I've not ever heard that and wouldn't really know. I suspect it's greatly exaggerated, though.

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[–] PM_ME_UNDRESSED 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Would you consider seeing a different, more empathetic psychiatrist, or has this negative experience impacted you too strongly? When and how did you discover that you had this disorder? What advise would you give to someone who is dealing with schizophreniform disorder?

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I currently don't need to see a psychiatrist. If I had need of one and a guarantee of the psychiatrist's empathy, I would consider it.

I began to fear that I would develop schizophrenia when a friend linked me an article about schizotypal personality disorder and suggested that I may have it. When I began to experience the disorganized behavior I've discussed elsewhere (e.g. compulsive pacing) I looked into seeing a psychiatrist.

To someone else dealing with schizophreniform disorder, I would advise that they build a support network of people with whom they can talk openly and without fear of judgement about their disorder. This is especially helpful if some of these people have experiences of their own with similar disorders.

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[–] obscure 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'd advise even those not dealing with schizophreniform disorder to build such a support network. However, it's a lot harder than it sounds, especially if you are "different."

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[–] tentonaraft 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why did you stop seeing your psychiatrist?

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

His only interest was medicating me, and I could tell he felt no empathy toward me. I discussed my reasons for refusing medication here.

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[–] RoninSnowman 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Sadly this is often a case in the Medical community where doctor's are pushed to prescribe medication because of the kickback scheme's they learn while in school and trying to establish residency, most hospitals have contracts with bigpharma's inorder to get medical compensation that pad's salaries. It's a disgusting practice, and it is not beneficial to patients, only to doctors and hospital admins.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] amde [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I experienced a number of negative symptoms as well as delusions (which did not fully develop until after I stopped seeing my psychiatrist) and mild hallucinations. The development of the schizophreniform disorder was preceded by schizotypal personality disorder (this was not diagnosed but I strongly suspect it would have been if I had discussed my childhood with the psychiatrist).

My life was impaired in that I would lose multiple-hour chunks of time to dealing with symptoms. I would occasionally be compelled to pace frantically for hours. The longest this happened was for about three hours. When experiencing hallucinations I would usually just shut down and cower until they passed. My interpersonal skills were also fairly impaired because I was often unable to articulate my thoughts. A number of people did suspect that I was acting strangely but did not ever confront me about it.

My life now isn't so out of the ordinary. I'm currently attending college and not experiencing any lingering symptoms.