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[–] mrrogerssweater 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Congratulations! What is your first language?

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[–] verificationist [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Or maybe not (it's Spanish).

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[–] mrrogerssweater 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yes it is!! Que emocion! Muchas felicidades.

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[–] verificationist [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Actually, I think it might be the same as yours.

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[–] TheMightyTim 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

As someone who is currently dreading having to take the GRE's for Grad School applications, what would you suggest as a good study plan to prepare?

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[–] verificationist [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Well, I would advise to get the official guide. It is the best one. Manhattan Prep is also good. But I don't advise to spend money on Manhattan Prep until you've done some practice tests, since you might already be good enough to reach a high score without so much prep. The most important feature of these materials is that they have lots of practice exams. Your preparation should consist of exam practice and non-exam practice, something like this:

For maths and verbal: Read the official guide from beginning to end. Review the maths stuff that you need to know, and then do two practice tests. Don't worry about timing yourself at this stage. Just focus on getting as many answers right as you can, taking your time. Read very carefully the explanations for the answers that you got wrong. Then set aside the practice tests and switch to doing non-exam practice.

For reading, you need two sorts of non-exam practice. First, try reading texts while you think about the answers you got wrong in the practice tests and ask yourself: how would the people who wrote the kind of answers I got wrong interpret this text I am reading right now? Which questions would they ask about it? How would they try to trick me? For this I recommend reading well-written things, for example, books of popular science written by recognised academics. Also, read publications such as NYT, The New Yorker, The Financial Times, The Atlantic. Secondly, you need to build up lots of vocabulary. Again, read stuff, and make lists of words. Don't try to blindly memorize definitions. The best way to learn fancy words is to see how people who know how to use them use them. So when you're making the list copy also the sentence where you read the new word. For maths: Just do lots, lots, lots of practice questions and learn the tricks. Maths is the easiest one to improve in.

After this, rinse and repeat. Do another batch of practice tests, read the explanations for your wrong answers, and see if they now make more sense. Then on to non-exam practice again, and so on. You'll find that in each iteration your ability to predict the correct answers and to think the way ETS want you to think will improve. As I said, at this stage you shouldn't focus on time. Just keep repeating the process until you find that you're able to find the correct answers to most of the questions in practice tests. Once you've done this, all you then have to do is start doing lots of timed tests. You'll already have the skill to answer the questions correctly, so by then you'll be free to focus simply on building speed.

For writing: There is a whole question bank, for both types of essay. What you want to do here is first read a couple of sample answers with a score of 5 and 6, as well as the examiners' comments. Your aim should then be to write as many practice essays as you can by using the question bank and to try to replicate as closely as possible the features of the sample responses which make them successful. As you did with the reading section, ask yourself: what would the examiner who wrote those scoring reports I read think about what I'm writing? It also helps to read good opinion articles. Copy passages which strike you as good writing and imitate them. The writing section is all about acquiring techniques of written expression and putting them together in an essay, and this is best learned simply through imitation. Again, focus first on quality, and only after you think you've got it start thinking about timing.

The key to the exam is: Understand the test. It was designed to make testing you easy. If you put yourself in the examiners' shoes, you'll ace it. This is why your greatest resource are practice tests with examiners' comments.

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[–] 2wizard 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Who did you have take the test for you? /s

Good job.

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[–] verificationist [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

And ok, ok, I'm not going to pretend that I didn't completely cock-up my first reply. I misread what you wrote as 'Who did you have [to] take the test for you?' The answer to that, as I said, is for philosophy graduate applications.

And I guess I had myself take the test for myself. But seriously, it would be impossible to cheat in that test. When you go into the examination room it's almost like going through airport security.

And thanks again for the kudos.

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[–] verificationist [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

*whom