0
3

[–] DreadPirate_Roberts_ 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

How long does it typically take to earn a pilot's license? It seems like a lot of work.

0
2

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Oh it's tons of work! Flying, studying, ground lessons, and sleep are about the only thing I do now. But it's all so fun!

It all depends on how mu h work you're willing to put in at a time. I've seen people get it in a month because they flew daily. Then, some it takes years. It all depends on frequency, skill, and effort.

0
1

[–] pilot 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

If you could ask an examiner one question before you take the practical test, what would it be?

0
1

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I've actually sat down and asked an examiner a few questions! One of those was: "What's one part of the test that people tend to fail most often?" She told me that people fail for all sorts of reasons, and there's no blanket reason that gets all students.

I actually had a friend take the test recently and she got him for an improper diversion or something small.

Most of the examiners are very open to questions since they want you to succeed. A few offer mock-oral exams before the real thing, but there's debate if that can be considered training or not. If it is, they're not going to be allowed to do them anymore; but we'll see!

0
1

[–] pilot 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'm an FAA Designated Examiner and there are four big things that we look for that will fail the flight portion:

  1. Action, or lack of action, that requires examiner intervention to maintain safe flight
  2. Failure to use proper and effective visual scanning techniques
  3. Consistently exceeding standards
  4. Failure to take prompt corrective action when tolerances are exceeded

In your friend's case, it may have been one of the PTS Tasks paired with #2. The diversion and clearing the area before stalls (airplanes) or settling with power (helicopters) are times when applicants often get focused doing things inside the cockpit and neglect to scan outside.

As far as giving a mock exam prior to a checkride, our particular FSDO would not allow that, but each FSDO is slightly different in how they do things.

Good luck on your checkride.

0
1

[–] LupinePride 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

What motivated you to spend all the money and time to get a pilot's license, given that flying for your own entertainment is ludicrously expensive, and commercial flight jobs are rare and vastly underpaid?

0
1

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

As the 8th pilot in my family, it's almost required to fly!

Let me clear up a misconception for you real quick: while low-time entry level airline jobs may only pay up to around $40,000, the flight instructors at our school make about $70,000 a year just by teaching due to out high volume of students. As an instructor, you're able to build the time that you need to move to a mid-level airline job, making around the same amount before you move up to an airline such as FedEx, or Delta, where Captains are known to make $250,000+ a year.

EDIT: To answer your question: it's just something that not many people get to do. It's an experience.

0
1

[–] LupinePride 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's far better income for an instructor than I understand to be typical. With opportunities like that nearby I can see why your whole family goes for it. Nice deal! I feel like you're skipping a few steps between "instructor" and "captain", though.

0
1

[–] thefoolofemmaus 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Any good stories about "that guy"?

0
0

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

"that guy" made an approach into some airport way too quickly within the past few years, bounced the landing, and planted the nose in the ground like a tree.

Yes, he's still flying!

0
1

[–] James557 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Congrats on getting your pilots license soon! I gotta say, flight school is one of those things on my bucket list.

Were you scared shitless your first few times flying?

If you don't mind sharing, what's around the ballpark cost of flight school? I've heard it's somewhere around 10 grand

0
3

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

There was one time that I was doing my first solo out to our local practice area. It was in a plane that I had never flown solo before, but I was slightly familiar with. Well, when I take off, I immediately notice that it's not flying well. I call to the tower and tell them I'm unable to maintain altitude, and I'll be turning around and landing on the opposite runway. They clear the other people off the runway, and I make a mid-runway landing, bouncing it twice. My instructor blamed it on my skills at the time, but it turns out the trim tab was broken... Figures.

With the school I work for, we estimate about $7,000 for a private pilot's license. Some schools more, some less. It all depends on local rental rates and gas prices.

0
0

[–] d3nmo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Does the school actively screen people to weed out possible terrorists, like the ones that caused the 9/11 tragedy?

0
1

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Every pilot is required to submit proof of citizenship and/or be approved through SEVIS and the Transport Security Administration. In addition, if they are a foreign student, they must obtain a visa and be cleared through immigration.

While we don't make an particular effort to "weed out" terrorists, the US Government's required security measures are pretty solid when it comes to letting people fly.

0
0

[–] d3nmo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for answering this, I always wondered about it!

0
0

[–] BeerBaron 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I've always wanted to get my license, but I have zero of the financial resources to own a plane and thus make getting a license practical. Are there "fly sharing" services or rental agencies that I would be able to borrow a plane from if I have a license?

Where abouts do you typically fly? What's the most memorable flight other than your first?

0
1

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Many schools have financing available, and are pay-as-you-go. So, each lesson of mine costs about $160-$200, and I can choose to fly once a week, three times a week, or even twice a day! If you're tight, you can choose to fly as often or infrequently as you like. I would highly recommend once a week at a minimum though.

I fly out of the Olive Branch airport in Olive Branch, Mississippi (identifier KOLV). For my cross country flights, I fly down to Tupelo and sometimes up to Jackson, Tennessee.

My most memorable flight is probably my first solo cross country. It's an amazing experience to be able to sit in an airplane, take off, and go somewhere new without anyone watching what you do... It's definitely a maturing moment.

0
0

[–] BeerBaron 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

It's on my bucket list, so hopefully one day I'll get up there on my own. An old dream of mine was bush-piloting in Alaska. Ever given any thought to doing something like that? Want a business partner? =)

0
0

[–] DoNotTrustMe 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Apparently there are two ways you can earn a pilots license.

Go to flying academy (1 year, fees are expensive upfront), or take flying lessons+independent exams (several years but easily paid for).

Do you have any advice for a friend not going to an academy? It's taking him ages to solo. He feels the people testing him are only failing him/giving peevish comments to keep him taking lessons and extracting more cash from him.

What do you hope to do after you earn your next license?

How expensive was your process?

How was the experience at your academy, did you enjoy it?

If you could fly to any location in the world, where would you fly?

Cheers x

0
1

[–] AviatorPrincess [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

There are two ways to get your license: Part 141, where you follow a syllabus set out by a flight school. It's FAA approved and can bend the requirements to get your license to require more or less. Then, we have Part 61 which simply means "meet the requirements and you pass." I am Part 61.

I would personally recommend taking lessons at your small, local flight school. There are many universities and "academies" that offer "professional pilot" ways to get your license, but most will cause you to pay too much, endure too much ground school, or take way too much time. Earning your license Part 61 lets you fly when you want, how you want, and with whom you want.

When I earn my Private Pilot's License, I plan on moving straight into getting my Instrument Rating, which means that I will be allowed to fly an aircraft without being able to see outside of the cockpit.

So far, I think I've dropped about $7,000 on the whole process. I have 43 hours of flight time, so it's not a bad figure for a student.

I absolutely love the school I fly with and work for. The planes are airworthy and the rest of the staff is super friendly. The best way to see if a school is good is to look at the front desk dispatcher and see if they're smiling and interacting with the students. The only irk that I have about my school is that there are way too many students per instructor and airplane.

Any place in the world? Probably Paris at 2,000 feet.

0
1

[–] DoNotTrustMe 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thank you for an awesome reply :) Will give karma when I get some haha $7000 isn't that bad actually.

Paris look beautiful at night http://urdu-mag.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Paris-at-night.jpg

load more comments ▼ (1 remaining)