0
2

[–] vivalad 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

do you have a buddy to help? i hear the hives are heavy to rotate(?) when collecting the goods

0
3

[–] AdderallTom [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

No, it's just me. Also you don't rotate hives, you take boxes full of honey off. But that's usually in the summer, which means picking up a 20-40 pound box of honey off of an upset hive while wearing a cotton full body beesuit in 110 degree weather!

But at least I don't have a boss.

0
2

[–] vivalad 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

thanks - i remember hearing there was a part requiring heavy (smallish person here) lifting.,,,but 20 lbs doesn't sound too bad. sounds like a good life :)

0
2

[–] AnmanIndustries 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Why in the desert? As you said, bees need water and they do not really exist en mass in a dry place like that.

0
2

[–] AdderallTom [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Because I live in the desert. In exchange for water those bees make phat stacks o' honey money which puts gas in my shitty Chevy. It's like the circle of life.

0
2

[–] AnmanIndustries 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Are there any native bees there there (most likely non colony types) that might be disadvantaged because of of the hived bees? Wouldnt it be cheaper just to import honey in from another state?

0
2

[–] GreatestOfAllTime 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

What plants do the bees pollinate? Are there limited resources the bees have to compete for? Are they always active or is there a time of year they lay dormant? Is the varroa mite a huge problem for you?

0
2

[–] AdderallTom [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Depends on the season, right now they're on creosote, catclaw, and alfalfa when the farmers let it grow too long. As for competition, beekeeping operates on a sliding scale. One hive can last anywhere. 5 hives to a yard if it's sparce. But when you're getting 36 hives to a yard, and their STILL producing? Oh boyo you're in the promised land. A surprising number of things flower out here in hot hell if there's just a few good rains. One of the benefits of the desert it the long season, only time there's nothing out is dead winter. Varroa is shit but it can be managed. Varroa will usually only knock out a hive if it is already weak. So I try not to let them get weak. Plus I medicate when there's no honey coming in.

0
2

[–] pyres 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Are they wild, or do you just steal it from other peoples hives?

Do bees do well in the desert? What types of pollens are they collecting?

Have you ever found bees that liked peyote cactus?

0
3

[–] AdderallTom [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

All the hives are managed, in Langstroth hive boxes, and are eye balled on an almost weekly basis.

Bees need to be provided water in the desert, hence the flatbed for carrying water. For pollen see above comment.

Also, bees will pollinate anything, but if I remember my research correctly, pollen does not contain enough amounts of chemically active substance to be used as narcotics. Unless it's those shit crazy Himalayan bees. Also I heard bees pollinating weed will make it shit.

0
0

[–] Waiyu_Dudat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Have you ever heard of a Flow Hive? https://www.honeyflow.com

If it works like they say it does, I think it'll revolutionize beekeeping.

0
0

[–] AdderallTom [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

There are many issues to using these boxes. But I'm only going to say one. Cost.

With free timber from Craigslist I can make a beebox and frames. Actually, most beekeepers do this. You can make free beeboxes en masse with just a table saw. That thing is going for $700 a pop. Now I've got 300 hives, and each one needs 3-4 shallow boxes, at least.

Also there's no way in hell I'm going to have honey pouring into a jar in a riled up beeyard.