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[–] scared_yung_father 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

How could I protect myself from someone like you?

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Stop using all digital communication devices (internet, phone, television that isn't over the air), never pay with plastic, never shop in the same place for the same product twice, never buy something habitually, and never go to a hospital (especially in the US). Basically, never do anything that might involve your actions generating any kind of paperwork.

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[–] Stavon 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Is it actually harder to get data for citizens with stronger privacy laws, like EU countries, compared to US ones?

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Is it actually harder to get data for citizens with stronger privacy laws, like EU countries, compared to US ones?

This is a tricky question, and it's ultimately one of the questions that are used to slowly strip away privacy laws. No, it's not difficult to get data at all. But most of that data can't legally be used. One country in particular is a bitch about it (storing and using personal data that is not expressly given by a customer is illegal, period), but thanks to the way US law doesn't give a shit about allies, they're easily skirted by temporarily opening an LLC in Delaware, or establishing a permanent satellite office in the US if the client desires.

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[–] Optick 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

What kind of information do clients most commonly request?

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Mainly information concerning what competitors are doing (hence "Competitive Intelligence"). A few years back, I was able to retrieve a competitor's entire year's sales and marketing strategy that one of their sales executives posted online. The link was only live for less than hour, but it was long enough for a webcache to snag a snapshot. Since I was able to pull it up through a search engine, that made it publicly-available information. The sales guys at the company I worked for at the time cut them off at every turn. ESPN was their biggest client loss--I'm talking tens of millions in revenue that was snatched up by our sales guys.

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[–] NamelessCrewmember 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

What types of info can you provide? How much?

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Usually, whatever information the client wants. Some of it requires a PI license in some states. Most of it doesn't. Cost varries, but the cheapest I've sold for was $4200/mo, and that was just surface stuff I found online.

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[–] NamelessCrewmember 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

That seems pricey. do you,provide more info than the automated websites that say they do a similar service?

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[–] Sikozen 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

1.) Is it really more difficult for someone in your position to acquire information on politicians than average people?

2.) Do you work for yourself or is there a company that sends you out like spiders to capture info? (Follow-up - if you've done both, do you have a preference?)

3.) Have you ever found info and then hid it/destroyed it for money/to protect someone/something?

Sorry but in my mind I'm picture some computer super spy. I'm sure it's boring and gross at times, but I'm fascinated.

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

1.) Is it really more difficult for someone in your position to acquire information on politicians than average people?

Technically (as in methodologically), no. But for some reason you apparently need a special snowflake brain to be able to draw conclusions from two sets of data. I've had employers who wanted to know if their employees were pregnant, and it didn't occur to them to just look through purchase history for alcohol and nicotine consumption, condom purchases, birth control purchases, or regular food purchases near hospitals.

EDIT: I misread this and somehow missed the "on politicians". I can't reply honestly; I've never knowingly been tasked to get information on a politician.

2.) Do you work for yourself or is there a company that sends you out like spiders to capture info? (Follow-up - if you've done both, do you have a preference?)

Yes. No preference.

3.) Have you ever found info and then hid it/destroyed it for money/to protect someone/something?

No, unless you count not reporting it as hiding it. I'm not paid for irrelevant information.

Sorry but in my mind I'm picture some computer super spy. I'm sure it's boring and gross at times, but I'm fascinated.

My family is convinced I work for the CIA. I'm not even American. The NDAs I regularly sign basically don't allow me to dispell those rumours. And it's probably boring to everyone but me. As for gross... not really, aside from that one time I found a client's products being sold on a jihadi website.

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[–] 1moar 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

How does it work landing new business?

How do you get the info?

Gov or private?

Answer what you can.

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

How does it work landing new business?

Mostly through recommendations or previous clients and co-workers in other fields.

When I started working for one company, pretty much everyone from HR and Legal wanted me gone. Engineers didn't understand what I did, and only the more savvier members of the marketing team were interested in anything I said. The sales team thought I just made a daily brief that anyone could do. Then for the first time in two years at that company, I took a vacation. My boss told me after that sales had spent the first few days of my vacation lighting up her phone demanding to know if "the guy who does the reports" had been fired, or quit, or was ever coming back.

Supposedly a lot of people's sales numbers had taken a noticeable dip. Partly because they weren't getting the highly targeted leads I was generating, and partly because they weren't getting information that enabled them to outmaneuver competitors' sales teams. Tech industry is cut-throat like that. HR made sure I had access to everything I wanted after that, and Legal was basically told not to interfere with what I did, and that their place was the clean up any messes. They never had to clean up any messes though, because I made sure everything I did was legal if not moral or ethical.

If this is a field you choose to go into, expect a lot of that. Guys who start out in Business Intelligence seem to have an easier time of it. But that's because a lot of them waste a year or more building their rep at a company as BI before pushing for a Competitive Intelligence initiative, or just working CI into BI. The latter method isn't efficient or cost effective at all, but whatever.

How do you get the info?

How don't I? Google. Something akin to FOIA. Certain databases both paid and free to access. Credit companies. Quarterlies and earnings calls. Sales reports. Consumer reports. Economic forecasts, weather forecasts. Word of mouth. Ever seen the Billions series? There's a lot of truth there, couched in drama as though it may be. Since I'm not a trader though, I'm not subject to quite so many SEC mechanisms. The FCC is more of a concern to me.

Gov or private?

Another tricky question. I have always been private sector. Some of my employers, however, have government clients. Read into that as you will.

Answer what you can.

I can't give details on some stuff mainly due to NDAs, but it's not exactly a "dangerous" line of work. Except for the carpal-tunnel. That shit will kill you.

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[–] bourbonexpert 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

how do i sell my internet information?

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You already do. Most of the time you sell your information, you're doing it in exchange for access to something (most prevalent would be access to software like playing video games). Seriously, read a TOS sometime. If you want to sell it in exchange for money, the easiest way to do that is to search for and join product focus groups.

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[–] bourbonexpert 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

If you want to sell it in exchange for money, the easiest way to do that is to search for and join product focus groups.

"one WEIRD trick my friend did to make thousands from home just by doing what she liked online!"

joking, but thats a good idea.

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[–] Bluetoothache 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I know advertisers spend a fortune on advertising but isn't product placement more important. I already know that I want to buy a widget before I search for it online. When advertisers learn that they got there too late. Most ads I see are after I already bought the widget.

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[–] 7852456632 [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Depends on the type of product placement.

If you're talking about product placement in TV, that's starting to have an adverse effect because people are hyper-aware of it. When it's done invasively (think the ridiculously long shot of the Oracle boxes in the back of the news van in Iron Man 3, or that one Britney Spears video that focused solely on a SONY camera) it's counter productive. Case in point, shortly after the iPad was released, you saw it on almost every TV show, especially those aimed at women (particularly crime procedurals). Now, if there is an Apple product on a television show, the logo is usually hidden or outright covered up. That has nothing to do with paying Apple royalties.

The popular trend in A/V media now is product use. That's largely thanks to vlogging. People want to know what mics and cameras their favorite vloggers use, what peripherals their favorite Let's Players game with, etc.

Case in point, I fought tooth and nail to get some guy one of a former employers' products. The guy made YouTube tutorials for aspiring 3D and graphic artists. My employer fought me the whole way. They didn't want to give it to him for free, I said we had to if we wanted it to work. They wanted him to spend X minutes talking about the product and showing it off in the beginning, I said that undermined the whole thing and he should just mention it off-handedly and put a no-fluff link in the video description to the product page. I said the guy should mention he received it from us for free, they said that undermined the whole thing. I mostly won out, and sure enough, sales for that product spiked for six months straight. The top comments were full of remarks like, "I always wondered what you used..." and "Wow, I just checked out the product page, those things are BEAST".

Sadly, I wasn't able to convince them to give one or two to members of the emerging Let's Play community at the time.

But product placement is still alive and thriving in other mediums. The smartest users of is are Amazon, IMDB, and others. The genius is that they use it on their own sites, where they have a captive audience that is not only open to advertising but is also usually in a buying mood. It's perfect targeting. Oh, and the kind of product placement I'm talking about?

"People who like this also bought..."

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[–] Bluetoothache 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

But is that really advertising or just upselling? Small difference either way. That does total work because it is filling a need.

New question: with half the country supporting Trump and conservative values, why do brands like Target, Starbucks, Amazon, apple push liberal policies like transgender and gay agenda? Don't they realize it hurts their brand with half the county? Isn't it better to just leave it ambiguous. As a consumer, I'm definitely restricting spending at liberal companies for these policies.

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[–] dallasmuseum 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sadly, I wasn't able to convince them to give one or two to members

Correct me if I'm wrong, but if only 2 people bought a product because of an endorsement that cost 1 product, wouldn't that make them break even?

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