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[–] nurebeat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Here's what I did for alternatives:

GMail - AOL Mail

Google Drive - Dropbox

YouTube - Zippcast

Chrome - Firefox (or Chromium even, it's just Chrome without Google.)

Google - DuckDuckGo

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[–] nonservator 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Dropbox appears to fail unless you allow Javascript from googleapis.

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[–] nonservator 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

As always when it happens, I'm curious to know why someone chose to downvote this.

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[–] nonservator 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Haven't watched the video yet; can anyone who has, give a summary of any significant updates to this material since the original non-video post ?

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[–] nonservator 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Watching: Bryan is joined by Aaron Siego of Kolab, "a free and open source groupware solution", and Jos Poortvliet, "all things open evangelist" at owncloud.org.. Bryan's puppet occasionally sounds like Triumph the Insult Comic Dog.

Aaron says Kolab respects your security and privacy, your data is your data, and "You are not the product." Jos tackles the question of why we want these things, pointing out that Owncloud can connect services instead of having walled gardens like Google Drive and Dropbox that are unable to share information, and bemoans not being able to install apps from the Google Store on an iPhone. Bryan wittily snarks that you can't install Amiga apps under MS-DOS.

Bryan asks what the main reason is for people moving away from services like Google. Privacy, security, control? Most people aren't moving, most people are using Gmail and everything else. What's the message? Aaron cites two events, the "Snowden revelations" which freaked out private individuals and companies who were not as technically savvy as the nerds who had been warning them about surveillance for years, and also how recently in Europe it was ruled that safe harbor (the mechanism of using American services from Europe) was "ill founded and no longer applies", which "exposed to people the reality that when your data is out there floating around, vested interests (corporate or state) will take advantage of it." Bryan asks Jos if he agrees. Jos agrees it's important but thinks most people don't understand these issues and don't care: "They are important, but a lot of things in the world are important that I don't understand or know much about." He notes companies increasingly using software like Owncloud instead of outsourcing their data. Google and Apple have billions of dollars and hundreds of millions of users; in comparison, "we're still playing in the markets." Does not believe privacy and security will be the primary thing that makes most people switch to Owncloud. Aaron thinks an interesting avenue to the average person will be that Google has not made their software available to run on ISP's and ASP's (internet, application service providers) infrastructures; notes a company who bought an ISP and who run Owncloud as a value-add service to their users, and who are about to start using Kolab in conjunction with Owncloud to cover both groupware and file storage. "That will be hundreds of thousands of users in one city who are using not-Google...we see more and more companies providing services to average people like you and me, asking, how can we get back into this game." They make money, and avoid Google coming between them and their customers.

Bryan asks about them recording this on Google Hangouts and distributing it via Youtube. Jos says he only uses open solutions "when they really are better. I think that's what most people will do. That's how it is. They make good stuff." Bryan agrees it's hard to move because Google is "so good, they're really good". Jos notes that with Owncloud, companies can actually compete with the likes of Google and Dropbox. Aaron "takes umbrage" with the idea that Google has good products, so hurrah for him. Call's Google's calendaring "pathetic". "The services that you get on Google generally...how can I put this politely? I can't use them. How about that? Email drives me freaking nuts. The calendaring routinely disappoints. And on and on."

Bryan says if Google and others provided open and secure tools, this need would not exist, "at least not for the same reasons." Asks: "What could Google do to make Owncloud pointless? Where you would be happy to not have that job?" Jos: "They need to start taking privacy serious." Bryan interrupts Jos's train of thought with webcam puppet tricks. Jos and Aaron mention the larger concerns like undersea cable monitoring. Bryan: "So they basically have to destroy their entire business model and do something different." Jos again says he likes Google products but mostly uses apps on Android. Aaron hates Google's mobile UI. Bryan thinks they can all agree that the world would be better with KDE Plasma on all mobile devices, but that most people like the proprietary offerings. Jos agrees the majority would not want to run their own server and there would still be plenty of room in the market for actual competition, and services would be more attractive to people.

Aaron calls Google a monopoly. Notes that Google destroyed the newspaper industry offering an affordable advertising rate to a hip tech-savvy audience. Thinks the same would happen to Google if they opened their tech, which is why he doesn't see it happening. Thinks people "like" Google software because they've become accustomed to crappy software, noting that "anything is a step up" from MS Exchange. "People's expectations are quite low," but when he has to use Google software he's amazed at how inflexible, featureless and misfeatured it is. "A lot of people don't know what they're missing. I don't expect them to educate themselves." Bryan agrees when he moved from Gmail to Kolab he was "surprised at how nice the experience was compared to what I had grown accustomed to. But I was very happy on Gmail prior to that." Yes, it was better over on the new, open systems, more nice features and customizations, but before that: "I didn't really know I needed to move...it was good enough."

Bryan ends on a practical next step for people: If someone wants to move one service away from Google, MS, Apple etc: What's the first thing to do to diversify and use more free services? Demands they choose specific service. Aaron asks them to sign up at Kolab, if you don't like it in a month you get your money back, and he thinks they will see the benefits of not being a product, not having ads in their face, having their data safe, having those extra features. "The online hosted version is in Switzerland, which the lawyers think has the best legal jurisdiction in terms of privacy and security for the individual..." Points out you can also install and self host Kolab. Pimps kolabnow.com. Jos does the same pimping for owncloud.org. Bryan says he uses and likes both services. Next year on Kolab: Video chat, real time collaborative editing, so they can do this chat again without using Google. Thumbs up all around.

(If you enjoyed this summary, I encourage you to write one yourself next time someone posts a video link.)