0
1

[–] RedditDead2005-2015 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The difference between animals and humans is that you could be breeding the next Lex Luthor. I'd rather take the traditional approach and have them struggle mightily in classrooms. That breeds character, and you don't get that from selective breeding.

0
3

[–] ShadowMongoose 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

You cannot "breed" a Lex Luthor. You cannot "breed" a Hitler. One is fictitious, the other was at least as much a product of his upbringing and environment (including the time period he was in) as he was his genetics.

Even if you cloned Hitler outright, you would have a better chance of raising a child that grew up to be a Jewish rabbi than one that leads the German people into committing genocide against the Jews.

Even if the threat of breeding the next Luthor were realistic, would it not be offset by the equally probable, yet opposite, possibility of breeding a Bruce Wayne?

Your point is as ridiculous as it is invalid.

0
1

[–] RedditDead2005-2015 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Firstly, I took this article to mean altering DNA and genes to produce a superhuman brain without taking into consideration of any negative consequences such as retarded growth and development of emotional centers in the brain or other physical abnormalities of the brain that serial killers and psychopaths have. You can't just "destroy the animal" like a lab rat if it goes wrong.

If you are talking normal selective breeding of humans, that is already being done at fertility clinics where clients can select sperm or egg donors by IQ as well as physical attributes.

itler was not a superhuman in intellect or physical abilities. He was just in the right place at the right time.

0
1

[–] HeadHunter [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'm not sure what you mean by the Lex Luthor comment. I do agree (if I interpreted your post right..?) that until we identify genes (if they exist) that increase/influence, say, a persons intelligence or musical ability that those skills could just be epi-genetic or a case of nurture rather than nature. In any case, hard work in classrooms means a lot for intelligence as well, and breeding smarter people probably isn't as easy as he says. I was just agreeing with his observation that the specter of Hitler and other non-voluntary eugenics programs (which I despise) are inhibiting possibly helpful discussions regarding the goal of increasing human fitness. Those are just my opinions though.