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[–] Native [S] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Edit: for all the faggots that keep saying once in awhile, 'My time is worth more, i'm sending it to the shop'...

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[–] Jobbyweecha 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

In my experience, the people who say this are either women, or guys who do nothing but watch TV/play video games.

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[–] Native [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Exactly.

I know so many guys who go to a mechanic to do an oil change and then bitch because it cost them 60$...Oil changes are the easiest damn thing you can do! And you can even drink a beer at the same time

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[–] KILLtheRATS 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Or people like me, who is full capable of doing mechanic work, but hate it

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[–] WhiteRonin 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Good job! Save cash and build up a tool Arsenal.

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[–] throughtheblack 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Every real man should have at least a modest assortment of tools.

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[–] WhiteRonin 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I’m rebuilding my tool chest. When I moved I didn’t want to shop my tools over seas. Would have been too costly.

But, yes, I agree!

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[–] ComedicGoat 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Thanks for posting OC, man. Always a treat when someone does, especially when it’s about the Chevy SBC

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[–] Native [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Thank you. I would have taken more pictures, I just was caught up in the work and forgot to take extra pics

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[–] ComedicGoat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

When’s the motor due for a timing chain replacement? It would have been profitable to do that as well since you had the water pump off.

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[–] throughtheblack 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The old Chevy short blocks were great engines, but the newer "LS" chevy short block engines are even better. More power, better fuel economy, more reliable and even easier to work on IMO. That's why everyone and their dog does LS swaps.

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[–] ComedicGoat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

LS engines are no doubt the best bang for the buck out there. There’s plenty to be had, too. One day I’m going to swap an LS into my 68 Camaro hooked up to a 6 speed.

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[–] DishingShitLikeA 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

FYI you should never have to top off your coolant with any more than about a quart every few months. This is due to evaporation from the reservoir bottle. Anymore than that and you have a leak you should fix.

Edit: and don't use any kind of Stop Leak product. That's only for dire straights or a vehicle you don't give a shit about. Fix it right.

2nd edit: that hole you were talking about is called the weep hole. It is located between the water pump shaft seal and the bearing. It is put there so any leakage past the seal doesn't immediately wipe out the bearing.

For taking the fan off in car with limited tools I would suggest with the belt on putting a crescent wrench on the fan nut and smacking it hard with a hammer to break it loose. Lots of them are reverse thread. It's very easy to decipher if it is left or right hand thread. Just look at the angle of the fan blades and that will tell you which way it spins. Always smack it in the direction of rotation and it will loosen. It's designed so that the drag of the air is always tightening the nut. When putting it on you don't even need to tighten it. Just snug it up.

I'm a mechanic if you have any questions feel free to ask!

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[–] Native [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for the advice! The reason why that fan was so difficult to remove was cause it kinda rusted on their. I live in extreme weather state. I did have to go back today though, I didn't tighten the hose clamps well enough and they were leaking.

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[–] DishingShitLikeA 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I know it seems counter intuitive but if you are able to use or re-use stock spring clamps for your hoses, do so. They are always tightening. Even after the rubber conforms. It's in their nature.

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[–] HomerChimpson 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'm actually going out to do some cooling system repairs on the pickup version of this truck today. Quick connect fitting is leaking. It needs to come out. Nothing beats a well taken care of older truck.

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[–] Native [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Good luck!

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[–] HomerChimpson 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It broke off flush with the head. Had to be chiseled out and retapped. I expect nothing less when repairing a car, if it can go wrong, it will.

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[–] throughtheblack 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

FYI, the coolant didn't compromise the hose rubber. It is designed to carry coolant. It is more likely that oil/grease build-up softened the rubber. It's a good idea if you have a few seeps and leaks on your engine, to wash it off now and then. Just don't get the electrical components too wet. Good on ya for doin' it yourself though. A lot of vehicle repairs aren't actually that difficult and it gives you a great sense of accomplishment. I say this as someone who actually makes a living fixing cars.

Oil changes are also an easy job to perform, but I would recommend getting a shop to do them once in a while, especially if you're not required to get yearly inspections in your area. Technicians make more money by "upselling" repairs when you bring your car in for an oil change. While this is a golden opportunity for scum bag mechanics to try to rip you off, it also means that trustworthy mechanics are incentivised to look for and notice issues you may not be aware of and notify you of them (this is less the case at "quick lube" shops where all they really do are fluid services, so take it to a full service shop). Of course this means if you don't trust your mechanic, you may want to verify that these issues are real before going ahead with any repairs. Also, remember it's your car, if they see something that should be repaired, and you feel confident doing the repair yourself you can go ahead and do that. Now, your mechanic would rather you pay them to do it, but a true professional will get over it.

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[–] Native [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You're right on the hose, the top part of mine was coated in grease and I ended up just cutting it off cause the hose claps were a pain to take off (I went and got the screw tight ones which are easier to use.

I would recommend getting a shop to do them once in a while, especially if you're not required to get yearly inspections in your area

Great advice, alot of rigs once they hit 100k start having front end issues with ball joints going out etc...and those are hard to diagnose and aren't really able to be diy fixed because the rig will need to be alligned afterwards anyway.

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[–] derram 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

https://www.hooktube.com/watch?v=trhJrE1I3kk :

1998 Chevy Tahoe 5.7L Water Pump Replacement (Part 1) -EricTheCarGuy - YouTube


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