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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Did some emergency repairs on my 150yo chimney. I burned wood for 1 winter & had water infiltration issues like liquid creosote coming out of the steel pipe inside by the spring.

The joys of renovating an old place :)

First step was fixing the mortar & loose bricks at the base of the chimney to make it last until I redo the whole roof in a few years.

Soon I'll be making a new chimney cap as the old one was rusted out & folded over. That's where all the rust stains came from. It needs a liner as well, I will post in /v/welding as I'm going full stainless steel on those projects.

This is a follow up to these 2 posts :

https://voat.co/v/pics/204821

https://voat.co/v/DIY/357313

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[–] Slayfire122 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Sweet grab man. I would have loved to find a place like this. Since moving back to the eastern usa, I've been drooling over all these old buildings. I would love to grab one of them, but property taxes are high, I frequently travel, and I only expect to be here for a few years.

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Look on the country side, you could find a cheap fixer upper as a place to chill when not on the road. Shop around a bit & you could have a life long "cottage" for pennies on the dollar

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[–] Dismal_Swamp 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Spray the exterior brick with Siloxane to waterproof it. On old brick like that I use Prosoco Sure Klean Weather Seal H40 but the Siloxane PD (pre diluted) works good too. The PD is half the price of the H40. I think I pay $320 for 5gal of the H40 and the PD is $125 for 5 gal. You should only need a couple gallons for that little chimney. A liner is a good idea if there's no terra cotta flue tile in it. Stainless Steel liners will last forever. Look up Olympic for liners or Copperfield Chimney. The opening of your flue should be 1/12 the size of the fireplace opening so you don't mess up the draft. Do you have a wood stove or open fireplace?

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'll look into that sealer, but I've had advice in the past about not doing it because this old brick breathes apparently & it could cause issues... ?

I'm fabricating my own liner & chimney cap, just waiting on our new cnc hysraulic press brake & shear to come in at work. The new shear was delayed while on the boat across the pond, so hopefully by the end of the month that project will be underway.

I have a Newmac woodburning furnace right now, thinking of switching it for a wood stove though. No power, no furnace.

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[–] Dismal_Swamp 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

That siloxane is made from animal fats and is used in cosmetics. It still lets the bricks breathe and moisture escape but keeps water from flooding in. It's more of a water repellant than a sealer. When it dries you can't even tell you sprayed the brick. Different company's sell the chemical siloxane but do some reading up on that specific chemical. I've been using it for 20 years and I have customers with chimneys going back to the 1600's. Never had a problem with it. Some company's mix other chemicals in with the siloxane so look out for that.

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[–] valk2 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I like stuff like this, always good to see something old restored to look great. Thanks for the content!

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

My pleasure ! I can't always be shitposting about kikes...

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Thx m8 ! I hate cheap write ups that leave you with more questions than anything else :)

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[–] chmod 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I had to repoint my retaining wall a while back. I can never get the mortar to match.

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

It's practicality impossible if you're fixing non-Portland cement mortar. Back then it was hand mixed lime & sand so forget perfectly matching an old batch, I've tried.

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[–] edistojim 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Nice work. I went back and looked at your other two threads. Looks like you've got a handle on this project. It looks well built to begin with and has stood the test of time. Good luck, I'm envious. Keep us updated.

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Thanks ! A real handful for sure, at least I can pick & choose my projects from a very long list of them, until I'm left with only the shitty ones...

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[–] edistojim 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Knock the shitty ones out first before burnout occurs. You are going to have a great place !!!

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[–] KikeFree 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I hope it had a ceramic liner. If not, I'm surprised it didn't burn down the house.

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[–] Rotteuxx [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Just brick & mortar, no liner.

That's my next project, making a 16ga stainless steel liner bfr putting a new chimney cap on.

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[–] ardvarcus 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Repointing brickwork is a slow, tedious job. The most important thing is to get the consistency of your mortar just right, so that it sticks to the bricks. You need to wet down the bricks first also, and give them time to half-dry, so they don't suck all the water out of your mortar. Buy or make a mortar board, so you don't lose 90% of the mortar to the ground.

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