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[–] Genocide 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

I believe the only true forgiveness comes with no pretense. You cannot forgive someone because of their remorse, but you can forgive someone for an action whether they are remorseful or not. This is the manifestation of true universal love, and it is very difficult to attain and give.

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[–] Phrostybacon 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

But what convinces you that "universal love" is really a good thing?

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[–] Genocide 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

A mass-realization of the interconnectedness of all things that allows humanity to transcend the limitations of the self and instead acknowledge that which hurts one hurts us all... I'm sorry, but to me the reason why it is good is self-evident - ending war, greed, hostility and instead working together to accomplish our collective goals; exploring the universe, truly caring for one another in a deep way... the possibilities are endless.

You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one.

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[–] psychosomatic 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

When I read this it makes it seem like once it is obtained it is there forever and permanent, but I believe forgiveness is a practice, and a daily practice like many things related to meditation or compassion. Forgiveness isn't something you obtain and forever have. Some days are easier to forgive then others.

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[–] Genocide 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Agreed - but I never intended to insinuate that it was a destination. I agree that it is a daily practice.

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[–] TheBeesTrees 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Forgiveness may be given, but remorse should not be taken into account to affect the punishment. One can forgive the person and still understand the requirement to maintain the penalty for the action.

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[–] pitenius 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Who is we? Me and you? Or the state collective that claims to represent "us"?

The last line of that bloast was pretty good:

The remorse might bring forgiveness, but not in the name of the victim which was abandoned by the remorseful killer.

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[–] Spacehuman 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Not all murders are equal. I'd have no problem condemning a man to immediate death or forgiving him depending on the circumstances.

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[–] 3GGGforce 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is such a difficult question. I think it is on an individual basis. I know if someone murdered my child I think vengeance would be my goal.

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[–] Butelczynski 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

In short-NO.

IMHO a lot of old laws made a lot of sense even if harsh by today's standards.They made people think twice before doing something wrong.

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[–] Question_Mark 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's a tough question, but I think you ultimately have to. Not for the sake of the murderer, but the sake of yourself. If you can't reach forgiveness, then all you have is hatred. And hatred is not only damaging to yourself, but damaging to others -- and frequently cyclical across entire generations.

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[–] fire_eyeballs 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

After reading the linked blog post, my answer is no. I cannot forgive a murderer because I was not the one killed, and if I was I never can. I wasn't the victim, so showing me how sorry you are is meaningless.

The remorse might bring forgiveness, but not in the name of the victim which was abandoned by the remorseful killer.

However, let's say my friend was killed. Would I forgive the killer? I don't know. Should I forgive the killer? No, I don't have to. Would forgiving be good for me? Probably, because forgiving would free me wanting to do terrible things in anger or guilt, knowing I probably won't do it. But I won't tell the killer that I forgive him or her.

If the killer was truly remorseful, then he would know what it's like to lose someone you love. If he was truly remorseful, then he would know he can't forgive himself causing someone that pain. If he was truly remorseful, then hearing my forgiveness will only hurt him, knowing he doesn't deserve it.

In spite of the killer’s desire to kill for getting power over his victim, he is under [the victim's] power of revealing humanity in its lowest forms [in the killer].

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