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[–] Craxic 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

So, there is 11mg/L or above in fruit juice that I buy from the supermarket. As a result, I may be receiving far more fluoride than what you would expect if you only counted the water I drank. That's what you mean?

I didn't touch on any of that. What I provided was a very incomplete analysis of the article, that's all. Regardless, its quite clear that I dont believe that fluoride is a big health problem, and that you do. So (no disrespect) could you please point me to some sources for your claims so I can read up?

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[–] foltaisaprovenshill 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

So, there is 11mg/L or above in fruit juice that I buy from the supermarket. As a result, I may be receiving far more fluoride than what you would expect if you only counted the water I drank. That's what you mean?

No, just that municipal water sources are by far not the only or the highest source of flouride that Americans are exposed to.

I'm just pointing out that it's often argued that the "dose" in municipal water supplies is not enough to be detrimental, which ignores the additional exposure from many other sources.

So yes, while municipal water sources do not make up 11mg/L by itself, combined with many other sources of flouride exposure, Americans may indeed be getting dosages much closer to 11mg/L than the amount cited as coming solely from municipal water sources.

Regardless, its quite clear that I dont believe that fluoride is a big health problem, and that you do.

I mean, that's one way of disingenuously dismissing the fact that municipal water supplies are not the only source of flouride exposure.