0
2

[–] brockhardchin 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Hello! I know the post is old but here are a few suggestions:

1 - Previous responses are right on the head - try to get involved in a research lab! This is such a resume booster when you are applying for jobs.

2 - Explore Research Experience for Undergraduate summer programs if industry internships are hard to come by. A database to explore is available here:

http://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/list_result.jsp?unitid=5048

3 - NETWORK towards the position you want! It feels slimy and unscientific, but this is really the new way to get your foot in the door. Establish a LinkedIn profile, join clubs and organizations, talk to your peers, friends, professors, or anyone else about your goals. Attend meetings and job fairs. There are a lot of ways to get introduced to the people that can place you in the right situation.

Best of luck, and let me know if you would like anymore information!

0
0

[–] dainbow [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Thanks for you response :)

I have no problem networking, I can be pretty outgoing and have had to navigate school and full-time employment until now. Again, thanks for the suggestions, I do not take them lightly. :)

0
2

[–] quantum_mechanic 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I know it's not a job but have you gotten lab experience from a PI at your school in a relevant field like electrochem? That will boost your application a lot, and you should get some credits out of too

0
1

[–] dainbow [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I have not! but that's a fantastic idea, thank you

0
2

[–] quantum_mechanic 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

No problem. Grad schools actually consider previous lab experience that aren't classes a big deal, so get in a lab asap!

0
1

[–] intono 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Some companies might offer internships, you could look into that as well.