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[–] stevesully23 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

That title hurts my head

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[–] no_on [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

dang ;_; my english is not as good as I thought EDIT: grammar

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[–] Gaterbate 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

As good as I thought would be the correct way

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[–] mamwad 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Seems like an english learner. In case it is, for improvement's sake---"What do you think, voat; did people alive 500 years ago think about the future as we do now?"

It's a pretty interesting question.

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[–] Gerplunckamo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

English is hard.

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[–] Gerplunckamo 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Well, 500 years ago, people took alchemy as a serious practice, and nowadays we just laugh at it. 500 years from now, people will probably say something like "didn't they know all those mobile devices gave them cancer"? And they'll laugh at us too.

However advanced we think we are, we will seem like backwards simpletons to the generations after us.

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[–] wafflesid 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I disagree. We've got the major foundations of science figured out. We're not leapfrogging previous generations like we did before. There are far fewer MAJOR breakthroughs like flight, electricity, etc. My father and grand father don't seem like simpletons. Hell, we were doing open heart surgery in the late 1800s. Thats amazing to me.

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[–] Gerplunckamo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The alchemists thought they had the foundations of science figured out too.

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[–] toats 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Quantum stuff is where the revolutions of the future will come from. If we can figure out how to harness matter/energy using other atomic forces, then things will change a lot. Even figuring out fusion will radically change society as energy prices plummet.

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[–] G4 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

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[–] mamwad 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

In case you're trying to learn English, the title would be better if it were written, "What do you think, voat; did people alive 500 years ago think about the future as we do now?"

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[–] no_on [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Is there a way to edit title?

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[–] mamwad 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

No. Don't worry about it. We get what you're asking.

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[–] EricHunting 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Our ancestors were very-much concerned about the future--far more than we are today. They planned very far ahead. Cathedrals were projects of generations. When a prominent building was constructed, forests were deliberately planted to provide lumber for replacement beams when they wore out or rotted away hundreds of years in the future. The difference today is our perception of the pace of change. Our ancestors saw the future as remaining, generally, very consistent over centuries. They felt a responsibility to, built legacies for, generations far forward. We now perceive revolutionary change at a very rapid pace and see it as unpredictable. We take very little personal responsibility for the future. We are victims of it, dragged backwards into the future rather than striding into it face-forward and claiming it as our own.

http://longnow.org/

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[–] Ray_Ciss 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The rate of change was much slower then. They expected to have lives more or less like their parents and their children to live like them in turn. I doubt that they actually formed that expectation because it was probably like the sun rising in the east. Unremarkable.

My great grandma was born just after the Wright brothers flew at Kitty Hawk, saw antibiotics, world wars, atomic bombs, computers, space travel, and fresh fruit in the dead of winter. She almost lived long enough to see her fellow Americans put someone like Barack Obama in the White House. That rate of change seems insane.

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[–] 1615968 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I can only hope we put something like IBM's Watson in the White House within our lifetime.