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[–] DingleMyCringle 0 points 72 points (+72|-0) ago 

Wait... We don't have to tip anymore if $15/hr becomes a thing? Shit, it's got my vote.

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[–] PIK-SHOE 0 points 68 points (+68|-0) ago 

See: Europe

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[–] 1rash 1 points 15 points (+16|-1) ago 

See: the rest of the world

FTFY

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[–] Chamois74 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

What do you mean? In europe, servers don't make 15€/h, it's just tipping is not as engrained in our society as it is in the US.

(If I completely misunderstood your comment, then sorry)

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[–] aileron_ron 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

In munchen the minimum wage is 8.50 euros ($11.75) and in the food service industry the tip is not given.

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[–] Elys 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Tipping is still a thing in Germany, at least. They just automatically include it in the bill.

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[–] defiantKITTY 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

It's a little more complicated because there are multiple minimum wages, there's one for non-tipped employees and tipped employees. Currently, the federal minimum for tipped employees is $2.13, but that is contingent on the employee receiving at least $30/month in tips.

I'm not sure about the specifics of the various $15 min wage proposals, and whether it's meant to replace all min wages, or just non-tipped, but either way I think it will be interesting to see if the culture of tipping will be affected by these changes.

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[–] nomarthedog 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

In NY the cook at Fridays will make less than the cook at Mcdonalds because Mcdonalds is fast food. It will not be at $15 an hour in upstate till 2021. I work at a Mcdonalds in highschool, as my first job. I like to think I learned a lot. I made 4.25 an hour and since I had no bills it was all gravy. No way they hire highschool kids to do that job now.

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[–] K-Anne-R 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Actually, I had read an article that a lot of restaurant owners had started advocating not tipping based on the law and how they wanted to configure their menu to make paying their staff $15/hr feasible.

"Bob Donegan, the president of Ivar's, which runs a chain of fish and chip shops, says the company has increased its prices. At Ivar's Salmon House, for instance, one of the company's sit-down restaurants, the price for all menu items increased 21 percent in April.

"Alaska coho that's today $34, last week would have been $28," Donegan says. "So that meal that last year cost you $100, today costs you $121."

The catch is that when diners pay the bill, they are no longer expected to leave a tip: it's included. The big price increase will allow the Salmon House to start paying a $15-an-hour minimum wage immediately, three years ahead of schedule.

"It's very early, but so far it's working OK," Donegan says.

Many restaurants in the city are watching Ivar's to see if the changes work and if they should follow suit, he says. But not every restaurant is in a position to experiment." From NPR

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[–] killbotgamma 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

ok, so its just the equivalent of leaving a good tip then.

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[–] Woohhaa 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Would workers who had previously worked for tips in the past be paid the minimum wage? If so would the tradition of tipping really be phased out?

I know no one knows about the second part but I'm seriously curious what other people think.

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[–] N2theoah 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

I personally like tipping, it gives the server incentive to ensure my experience is wonderful. In the many European countries I have dinned in I can say that I have yet to find service as good as a mediocre establishment in the US.

All this said, the way that US law works is that a server must be paid the equivalent of minimum wage for each hour they work. So compensation at restaurants is set up so there is a small base hourly wage, usually below minimum wage, with the expectation that the server will be paid a tip. If the minimum wage is increased, the base wage would also increase, but not to the $15 level, as tips would still be expected to be paid.

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[–] PIK-SHOE 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Tipping is still a thing in countries with decent wages for waiters. Some, like Spain or France, you leave some spare change a couple of euros in coins, called "pourboire" ("for drink" in French, so the waiter can get a beer after work). From what I remember from my time in England, you don't tip at all unless you really liked the service.

I think people will continue tipping if they are satisfied, just not as much. Also people on a budget (college students) won't feel obligated to spend the extra money.