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[–] gervase 0 points 37 points (+37|-0) ago 

At least for me, this is really two questions in one: dealbreakers when you're applying for the job (things that will stop you getting hired), and dealbreakers when you're already working here (things that will get you fired). There are a lot more of the first than the second.

(Some) Interview dealbreakers:

  1. If I catch you lying.
  2. If you can't follow basic instructions.
  3. Arrogance, especially misplaced arrogance.
  4. Apathy.

Job dealbreakers:

  1. Inability to complete tasks. This is obvious - if you don't do what I pay you to do, then I will stop paying you.
  2. Anything criminal. Again, obvious. Don't break the law at work, OR at home using your work email. Christ.
  3. Failure to appear. If you stop showing up to work, I'm going to fire you. You will not magically keep getting paid because no one noticed. (This happened TWICE!)

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[–] Tim_Honks 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

You sound like you've had experience with #2 on the things to get you fired side. I myself just dealt with a number 3 which means I am back to doing an entire department by myself. Seriously - kid just stops showing up one day, no warning.

No wonder recent college grads don't get hired - they pull shit like that.

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[–] ViolentlyMasticates 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Do they just not understand what a job is? It's not like university lectures where you can choose to go or not go to work. You HAVE to turn up.

I would imagine most people are smarter than that, at least on this site, but fuck, the amount of people who pull those stunts amazes me.

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[–] etherflan 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I have a coworker who has been MIA for over a month. Still hasn't picked up paycheck or returned phonecalls.

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[–] Paranoidroid 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Just to be clear, you're not talking about recent college grads working at the french fry station, are you?

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] gervase 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I mean, a call or an email explaining the absence would be understandable - at least a nod towards some semblance of professionalism. Disappearing with no warning, and refusing to answer any emails, calls, or texts is just not going to fly.

I've found the problem with docking pay is that sometimes people feel that this means they now have uncapped vacation time. If you want to take an unpaid month off, it doesn't count as a valid vacation just because I'm not paying you - see job dealbreaker #1.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] gervase 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Lying on resumes is extremely common. Extremely. And about stuff that's easy to check, too, like what languages you speak. If you list Spanish fluency on your resume, and I need someone who speaks Spanish, I'm going to have someone else who speaks Spanish chat with you!

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[–] ViolentlyMasticates 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Addition to the job deal breakers would be all those things from the interview deal breakers.

The amount of people I see who try and over step their mark when it comes to their job out of sheer arrogance is amazing. You'll see people on power trips in their smaller positions because they think they are somehow immune to being fired because they're on salary or union. But there are so many cases where its cheaper to fire them and pay them out than to keep them on. I've seen it happen many a time.

Also, not just lying to me, but lying to customers. That is even bigger of a deal breaker. That immediate firing level stuff right there. Both in the professional realm and in retail, lying to customers ALWAYS brings about more hurt than it seems to solve.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] ViolentlyMasticates 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

I feel like this is for certain jobs. I don't mind people who are on Voat/news websites while waiting for programs to compile or downloads to complete. As long as they reach their KPI's for the day, it's not the end of the world.

However, for things like fast food or other service industry jobs, yeah, big no no.

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[–] JH1010 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

If you work on the till in a busy takeaway, there's barely time for a toilet break.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] thealcoholist 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Oh crap, and here I am voating...

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[–] ScreaminMime 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

It's alright, so was the boss just now.

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[–] BeerBaron 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

This!

I worked residential treatment for kids once. Our primary job was to WATCH kids. How can you watch kids when you're constantly looking at your phone? This was absolutely an age-related issue, too. Anyone over ~30 never had a problem with this. Just out of college, or mid 20's, you would think I had just asked them to kill their parents with the way they react to being told to put the phone away.

One chronic abuser of this wound up with an incident where 5 of our 9 kids had some level of sexual contact with each other while he was working the shift (the other 4 were outside w/ other staff). So either he was asleep or too involved with his phone to realize what was going on in the next room. Either way, his 4-yr degree in psych and dream of working as a social worker were destroyed having been accused of child neglect and endangerment. My spirit weeps that the incident happened, but I'm glad a shitheel like that won't be allowed anywhere near the field ever again.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 16 points (+17|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 1 points 21 points (+22|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Atsu333 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Just because he did it doesn't mean it's acceptable. Same thing as if, for example, a person started drinking heavily at 16, they shouldn't just allow their kids to do that just because they did. At some point, OP grew up and realized the error of his ways. Possibly after being fired multiple times.

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[–] wbw 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This is what gets me-- a boss says they went through the same thing and was late all the time. You were late once and they threaten you with a write-up, despite having a medical condition which makes it almost impossible to sleep.

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[–] probablynot 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Agreed that if there's some important, explicit reason why an employee needs to be somewhere at a specific time, they should be there on time. But I don't get why people treat punctuality as a virtue — punctuality for the sake of punctuality. Who cares if you show up on time as long as you're effective, are able to generate revenue for your company, etc.

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[–] SybilVimes 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

My big problem with timeliness is that I work in healthcare. It's a 24/7 business. If you're late to an office job, then the lights stay off and the door locked. You're late to my work, and that means that someone that just finished their shift has to wait for you to get there. And we can't just toss the keys and leave, we have to give a report on each patient. So being habitually late where I work is an ultimate "screw you" to your coworkers.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] SybilVimes 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

When my ability to be relieved and go home depends on your ability to be on time, it's more than just a "hang up".

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[–] HorizonBrave 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I guess it really depends on the job. Like /u/nomeraques said above,

When your job involves opening a store and selling things to people and the sign in the door says you open at 08:00, you better be open at 08:00. If your job is to write code, I don't care if you do it 9 to 5 or in the middle of the night.

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[–] KommMaster 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

My boss has yet to arrive at work on time since he took the position. I'm almost always on time (if I'm late it's by only a few minutes) and I have to wait for him before I can even get in the building.

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[–] AmpDragoness 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

People who don't even try to look good for an interview.

I ran a work experience program where I placed people in jobs for nonprofits. I get that the people I was helping were often in rough places in their lives but I was still suprised how many just didn't care to try at all. For every homeless person who did their best to look as clean and neat as they could I interviewed 20 lazy fucks we go just dumped a gallon of perfume on instead of bathing. (And I gave those homeless the jobs after hooking them up with places to get new clothes and take showers before work)

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[–] garik 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

How did you know who did their best and who didn't?

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[–] AmpDragoness 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

If you come in filthy dirty, in so much perfume I could smell you when you entered the building, shirt unbuttoned with a greasy inappropriate t-shirt on underneath, dusted in fast food crumbs, and obviously didn't even comb your fingers through your hair? Pretty sure you didn't try at all. Wash your face in a public bathroom sink, button your shirt, take the cigarette out from behind your ear, and at least TRY to look presentable. Sit up straight and don't start telling me about how you smell like booze because you were at this "fucking bitchin party" last night and you only just woke up at 2pm.

To contrast the homeless people I met who washed up as best they could and at least TRIED to look and act presentable? There's no contest as to who I would hire.

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[–] astroskag 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Late to the interview, especially with no advance warning - if I get a call 10 minutes before you're supposed to be here with "Hey, I'm in traffic", I might think less of your ability to plan ahead, but it's not an instant no. If you're late, though, and didn't call, I take three things from that - a) you're unreliable; b) you're too selfish or inconsiderate to respect other people's time (if you don't value mine, you surely won't value your coworkers', either); and c) you don't really want this job.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] CapnKnuckles 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I had actually went to an interview where the person interviewing me didn't even show up. When I arrived and informed the desk I was there for my interview with the program director, they looked at me puzzled and explained she was on vacation and wouldn't be back for a week, but that they would have her call me......I couldn't even believe it.

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[–] Librarient 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I have sat on numerous interview panels, and we usually schedule about 2 hours for an interview: an hour or so for the actual interview, a half an hour to deliberate directly after, plus an extra 30 minute padding. However, some interviewees are long-winded, or something unexpected occurs with the technology and we get a little behind. I think running 15-20 minutes late would be ok if there were prior interviews. However, I would expect that someone would pass that information on. "Mr./Ms. Smith? The interviewers are running a bit behind. We apologize for the wait. They will be with you shortly."

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[–] powny 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

I know that. Employers plan for people being late though. When you're hiring people from out of town/state/country, you don't really expect them to be 100% on time. They will have flight issues, get lost on the way from the hotel to the office, their phones won't adjust the time zones correctly, their phones are dead because they traveled for a day.

There are tons of reasons for an employer to give you 45 minutes until they actually go and pick you up. I've been late for interviews and got the job. I've been early and didn't. It doesn't matter that much really. At least not when you're talking about real jobs (permanent with bonus and benefits).

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[–] Librarient 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

What's worse is when they just plain don't show up. If you are no longer interested, how hard is it to drop a quick email or pick up the phone and let me know? This boggles my mind because what if you decide to apply for another job with us? You can bet your ass that we are no longer interested because you couldn't be bothered to let us know what what up.

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[–] austin__ 2 points 12 points (+14|-2) ago  (edited ago)

  1. smokers
  2. grossly overweight
  3. liars
  4. inability to speak english
  5. consistently late
  6. bringing personal problems to work

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[–] doctor_cucumber 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

That 1 downvoat- found the smoking, lying, illiterate, chronically late, drama-hauling fatty.

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[–] ScreaminMime 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

Smokers are the worse, you KNOW the grounds are going to be littered with butts none of them belonging to them.

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[–] NewtAgain 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I understand not hiring regular smokers. But i smoke occasionally and haven't been able to apply for jobs because they drug test for nicotine. I will have cigars on the weekends but i never smoke when at work. Sometimes i think companies take nicotine cessation a little too far.

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[–] castillle 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

smokers

These guys and their god forsaken constant breaks piss me off. My manager was a smoker and he was constantly out smoking with the rest of the smokers.

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[–] etherflan 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Out of curiosity, aren't some of those illegal if people find out?

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[–] 1253715? 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

They are only illegal if you say it out loud or put it in writing, but you would have to be an idiot to do that.

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[–] austin__ 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

not in my state. I can fire for any reason and without notice.

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[–] doctor_cucumber 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Not in the US as far as any law I've ever read goes.

Protected groups include race, sex, disability, and sometimes sexual orientation.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Paranoidroid 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Think I found at least one silicon valley manager here.

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[–] Speculater 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

How many do you want me to fit?

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[–] BeerBaron 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How many tennis balls can you fit into a limousine?

What exactly are you looking for with this question? Are you actually looking for someone who can come up with an answer?

If you asked me that question and I lobbed back "I'm not sure since I don't know the volume of a tennis ball, nor do I know the size of the limo in question. I can take a guess, but I wouldn't want to give someone false information without some sort of way to verify its accuracy first". Now, that's my honest answer, because I don't like lying in an interview, but would that be a 'good' response to your question?

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[–] Mopstorte 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This site shows 4 of these types of questions and explains what the employer/interviewer is looking for and how they're supposed to be answered.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Navidson 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Blatant lying. I hate when I can see a task undone and someone is telling me at that moment that they did in fact complete it. Or dropping/breaking/spilling something and denying it. Things are so much easier to fix in the moment rather than finding and dealing with it later. If I can't trust that you'll do the job right, you're useless to me.

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