[–] watch_listed 0 points 22 points (+22|-0) ago 

The EU went and changed their shit around a couple of months ago, so you have to accept a cookie saying that you accept their cookies. If you clear your cookies, you have to re-accept their cookie accepting cookie all over again.

[–] clamhurt_legbeard 1 points 12 points (+13|-1) ago 

I like the ones that say "...or by continuing to use this site"

So, you already installed shit?

[–] totes_magotes 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

By visiting the site, they installed cookies. The cookie is already there but they're now required to say that if you want to continue to use the site, you have to accept the cookie.

See the problem?

[–] TheBuddha 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

Yes. You sent my server a request. My server responded with, "Okay, here's a cookie." It delivers lots of things to your computer, 'cause that's exactly what you asked for when you sent a request to my server. If you tell me you don't want to have that cookie, I have to tell your browser to remember that. Which requires writing a cookie that says you don't want more cookies.

That's kinda how the 'net works, with regards to regular surfing. If you don't want a cookie, use wget. I don't mind.

[–] MyDrunkAccount 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

But all I want is some milk

[–] opticbit 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

GDPR

[–] Dougal_McHaggis [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Why did they make this law in the first place? Who actually reads that shit or gives a fuck?

If you're typing personal shit in to the internet just assume it's public domain. I dont give a fuck if they know my screen resolution or what other sites I visit.

Fucking beaurocrats.

[–] watch_listed 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Fuck if I know, I don't live there. I think it was something to do with privacy policies and tracking.

[–] elitch2 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Noticed that as well. Install ublock, noscript, and https everywhere.

They either do not pop up, or you can just click blank space to get rid of it.

[–] GoBackToReddit 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

ublock

"uBlock Origin"

I'd also add "random agent spoofer" to the list. The settings can be a bit touchy and it's not a complete spoof... but it does what it can well imo.

[–] Dougal_McHaggis [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

You need more than user-agent spoofing. They can generate a hash of all the data your computer will give javascript and use it to ID you. Some can even use inaudible sounds to track you.

IP, software versions, screen resolution, cpu model number, hard drive model, free disk space values, USB info, all sorts.

[–] Liberty4thewin 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Regarding user agent spoofer, this is why to use it, although it spoofs it does create a unique fingerprint, so have it random, or set it up to be a common profile www.amiunique.org

[–] Kekmet-Peperoni 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Mac Address Spoofing?

[–] drj2 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Add brave browser to that too

[–] Liberty4thewin 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

in brave you can just use turn off scripts for any page with this cookies popup

[–] Kekmet-Peperoni 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Is there a decent No Script for Waterfox? Because Waterfox is based off a decent Older version of Firefox I cant install to Waterfox.

[–] Liberty4thewin 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

yes, umatrix combines https everywhere, script blocks and spoofing referer

[–] P33psh04h 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Just install Chrome Canary.

[–] Ina_Pickle 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Yes you can. You download the addon from firefox and it installs on waterfox as if you were using firefox, because in essentials you are.

[–] MarcusA 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's called GDPR, a series of laws in EU that controls what a company can do with personal information. It's very broad, anything that can identify you, even your IP is personal info, and it's pretty restrictive, including where the data can be stored geographically. You have to opt in for any collection, can request a printout of anything collected, even demand full deletion within like 14 days.

It's actually pretty good for individuals, and for software vendors riping out compliance solutions. Companies on the other hand, have a whole new expensive regulation to deal with.

[–] mcdowell_ag 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

For most people the net impact of GDPR is that they will click to assent to a lot of legalese they don't care about. All that GDPR has bought them is a lot of annoying clicks and possibly the risk that they will get into the habit of clicking on stuff and end up succumbing to a scam because of this. I suspect that only a few enthusiasts, journalists, and politicians will exercise their rights under the GDPR, and most of them won't gain any concrete benefit by doing so.

As far as I am concerned the main benefit of GDPR is to demonstrate that the EU are completely clueless on the effects of their attempts to regulate technologies that they don't understand.

[–] JimSoddell 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I have several commercial web sites. In my evaluation, and of my attorney, it's not technically or legally possible to comply with the full scope of the GDPR.

Therefore we have blocked all known EU ip addresses at the firewall level of our servers. We also have added a section to our terms and conditions that we are not GDPR compliant and do not give permission from anyone under GDPR jurisdiction to access our sites.

So, we don't have to have those popups. We also don't track you, BTW.

[–] Dougal_McHaggis [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

If your corporation and servers are in the US why even give a shit about GDPR?

[–] JimSoddell 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

You must then be totally unaware that the US routinely arrests and also extradites foreign nationals who are accused of committing cyber-crimes in our territory remotely. Having a website that doesn't comply with GDPR and is available to EU citizens and residents is considered by the EU to be a prosecutable cybercrime. Blocking access is no skin off our back since EU sales were never significant and are not worth the risk of having any of our executives apprehended just because they are on vacation in Nice.

Not sure why you are bitching like a whiny cunt about our policies. We don't track you and we don't give you bullshit popups. That's what you want right? Dumbfuck.

[–] Durm 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Blame the EU. They got away with this inane bullshit the first time, and went back for more.

[–] NACHTJAGD 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

  1. Install uBlock Origin: https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases
  2. Open the dashboard
  3. Open the tab '3rd party filters'
  4. Scroll down to the annoyances list and check the box for 'Fanboy’s Cookiemonster List​​​​​​​'.
  5. Scroll down to the bottom and enter the URL: 'https://raw.github.com/r4vi/block-the-eu-cookie-shit-list/master/filterlist.txt' into the box and enable this custom filter.
  6. Press the yellow button 'Apply Changes' in the top right corner.
  7. Go to the top of the menu again and press 'update now' to update the filter lists.

Fixed!

[–] SirDigbyChikenCaesar 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

No, it's another EU thing from a month ago.

[–] Dougal_McHaggis [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why are American sites doing it?

[–] SirDigbyChikenCaesar 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Because people in the EU can still view them and the sites can be held accountable there.

[–] Commie_Meta 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

Some of them are run by idiots, some by authoritarian lackeys, and some use content distribution networks with servers in the EU.

[–] theoldones 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

if you click YES, they have the legal right to fuck with your system because a pop-up message, and a system command look the same to a computer. remember that tip.

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