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[–] captbrogers 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

The telecom companies that provide internet service thought the way the mafia handled business was a good model.

Establish territories and have some unspoken deal with rivals to not directly compete. Comcast, charter, spectrum, time warner, and others all do the same thing with nearly identical underlying technology/structure. Yet the never compete with each other. I would be surprised to find any place in the U.S. that you can get service from more than one of those listed above.

Extort money from others for protection. "It'd be a shame if something happened to your connection with Netflix."

Part of my answer is tongue-in-cheek, but they seem too similar to me. Like mob bosses got wise and found a way to keep doing things the way they used to but on a more business enterprise level.

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[–] Anson [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Extort money from others for protection. "It'd be a shame if something happened to your connection with Netflix."

Actually, i think there's something deeper here, with regard to economics, but I haven't figured it out or been clever enough to internet search for something that will tell me what it is. I could write pages and pages on what I'm about to say, but I don't have time right now, so I'll do my best to sum it up in a sentence or two: People seem to have no problem going to work and having their paychecks reduced by as much as 1/3 due to taxes - yet if you were to give them 100% of their check then have them voluntarily hand over 1/3 of it they'll have a major issue with it.

And there are soooo many variants of that example that it's enough to create a concept and formalization of the technique. I'm sur eit's out there; can't find it though.

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[–] captbrogers 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I've said the same thing before. Force people to be responsible for their money and a lot more people would be responsible with their money. I pay taxes, but I don't make payments. I just set aside money each check myself and it pisses me off how much I have to put into that account.

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[–] DeliciousOnions 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It turns out, running actual racket businesses is more profitable than extortions. Who'd have thunk?

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[–] captbrogers 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

They extort some accountant, "Have ya ever thought about doing this as an LLC? You could write of the gas it took to get here!"

And now we have Comcast and others like them.

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[–] AlienEskimo 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Periodic movie trilogy reruns on HBO

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[–] Eualos 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

RICO was a pretty big effect from the mafia. Incidentally, if you Google RICO it shows DJT for some reason which is fucked up.

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[–] middle_path 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Gaba-guul

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[–] Dsciexterminationist 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Theyre still around, they just look like small business owners and live in the burbs. Labor rackets, fraud, gambling, money laundering, that sorta shit still happens.

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[–] theoldones 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

olive oil ive heard, apperently

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[–] Anson [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

prove it

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[–] PaulNeriAustralia 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago  (edited ago)

The main effect, as far as I can tell, is that the Mafia has morphed into the Charities. The similarities are uncanny. There's a CEO (Godfather) who is on a nice little earner. The Charity's soldiers go out onto the streets extracting money from members of the public in ways approaching extortion. They know where we live and indeed bang on our doors after more money. They have our telephone numbers too and sell our private information to other "families". And it's all legit because part of the money skimmed by the Charities goes to African kiddies which keeps the Government off their backs. It's such a lucrative business that the old criminal ways can't compete.

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[–] Ban_Circumcision 2 points -1 points (+1|-2) ago 

Italian Mafia you mean Murder Inc, which was run by jews?

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