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[–] prairie 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Imperial units are used because they're good for what they're used for.

I use cm and mm for measuring smaller things. Inches and fractions are lunacy. Maybe I just need to find a ruler that has tenths of an inch ticked off rather than eighths or sixteenths.

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[–] IDintDoNuthin 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Half of 1 is 1/2

Half 1/2 is 1/4

Half of 1/4 is 1/8

Half of 1/8 is 1/16

Half of 1/32 is 1/64

COMPLETE LUNACY HERE

Omg, actual divide 1/4 = 0.25

Omg, actual divide 1/16 = 0.0625

Wow wow wow, Velocity = Distance / Time therefore Imperial velocity is so confusing they take an Imperial Distance divided by Imperial Time and get some meaningless output that simply does not work at all.

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[–] prairie 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

7/16

3/8

9/32

As opposed to simply counting the ticks, e.g. 6 ticks = 0.6

It's an extra step, and if there's nothing to mesh with, I'll choose metric any day.

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[–] Merchant_Menace 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

For precision work we use "thou" which are thousandths of an inch and "tenths" which are a tenth of that. The fractional lengths you're talking about with other bases are more used for standardized sizes like screws, wrenches, etc. Incidentally, you use our 1/4", 1/2", and 3/8" standard for your socket wrenches. You know, on account of standards being useful and convenient to just keep in place.

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[–] prairie 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Incidentally, you use our 1/4", 1/2", and 3/8" standard for your socket wrenches. You know, on account of standards being useful and convenient to just keep in place.

Thinking about all this there are different uses of measurements. One, like with sockets, where you need the exact size, and the units don't really matter. Here the values are essentially just unique names for each. In other uses, like cooking, you just need to be able to add and divide the units, so imperial versus metric isn't an issue (and imperial might win due to its fractional heritage). And then there are more general uses, where ease of representation as a decimal value and moving measurements between different domains are important for calculations. The point is that these can coexist without much of a downside as compared to using the same units for everything. Where it matters, one can use metric throughout, as my example of using metric for measurement.