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[–] zyklon_b 1 points 31 points (+32|-1) ago 

Yes look at the nose.

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[–] kneo24 [S] 1 points 18 points (+19|-1) ago 

Well, I mean, I think it goes far past the nose. The nose is just the first indicator. Take vampires for example. Not only do they prey on the weakness of others (especially women), and lure them into degenerate things, they treat normal people like cattle or in some cases, chattel (goyim). Witches honestly aren't any different here. Instead of some psychic power to lure in people, it's the allure of magic potions, or magic spells, combined with stories of them harvesting people as a food source, or more often, harvesting children as a food source.

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[–] zyklon_b 2 points 12 points (+14|-2) ago 

DEATH TO ALL JEWS

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[–] unclejimbo 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

They can't see their reflection is metaphorical of the way the jew projects his own guilt while never admitting it.

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[–] scoobatron 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

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[–] chirogonemd 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's likely that humans have always created hyperbolic/fantastic depictions of things which harm or frighten them. Monsters. They represent our archetypal fears of darkness, deformity, harm to the flesh, and of course, death.

So take a vampire, for instance. A creature that is arguably dead (or hovers on the edge of), was historically depicted as more grotesque than compared to the teen fiction of today, harmed humans and killed them. Garlic has long been known as a general anti-parasitic plant remedy against many things. Also, silver. So naturally, the vampire is warded off by garlic and silver. Many other examples of historical baddies have had a weakness to silver. Our monsters are just exaggerated versions of actual things that hurt or ailed people for all time.

Humans have always created quasi-divine "super heroes". To define themselves, these characters literally required the villain. The monster.

It's likely that you are just making a more modern metaphor for the jew as a social predator, which is causing you to identify them with depictions of monsters that also preyed on humans.

They all just share in pool of similar qualities that humans haven't liked much for millennia, but the origins of these monsters were not the Jews.

It could be possible that certain specific depictions of these monsters may have included some stereotypical Jewish features. After all, these monsters have been in popular lore/media for many centuries. If I hated a particular group of people, and I was also writing a story about some undesirable creature, it could either consciously OR SUBCONSCIOUSLY happen that I illustrate those monsters to resemble someone I hate.

But if I wanted to create or depict a monster, the general idea to produce something scary will usually involve deformation of the human anatomy, in one way or another. This is usually by twisting and contorting, distorting the sizes of, or grossly mutilating certain parts of the body. Here's the important point: in a day and age when people didn't have the striking visual media we do today, or the special effects to create a Freddy Kruger skin or a Hellraiser cenobite, it was much easier to distort the size of features. Noses are an easy target because it looks more menacing and less comical than giant ears or lips. And truly, its got to do with shape as well. A slightly oversized but pointed ear could be menacing. But giant droopy ears become cartoonish.

There have been famous vampire depictions with exaggerated jaw lines, especially huge, pointed chins. The famous pointed hair lines. All to reinforce the idea of "sharp", "pointed", "biting". Frankenstein was made grotesque by making his entire body oversized and built of parts from different bodies. The classic depictions of his ridiculously square head with oversized brow and cheek bones.

ON WITCHES: These are different. There is a lot more going on historically here that is waayy to much to get into in this post. But witches weren't always depicted or portrayed in stories as grotesque. In fact, it didn't really help a witch politically or socially to be so malformed. The ugly depiction of witches came about largely after larger scale printing was possible. You see, there has never been a monster in our popular culture with so much going on politically/religiously. To get to your point about Jews, a lot of things could get someone accused of witch craft. But begging, instigating quarrels, or defrauding were on that list. During the 16th or 17th centuries, and given the history of Jews in Europe during the dark ages, it could easily be that depictions of witches in print were made to look more Jewish. I think the possibility is bolstered by the fact that the persecution/accusations of witchcraft was a Catholic crusade. By this time in history (16th century), a large number of nations (but of special interest: Spain) had expelled the Jews. There had been a popular unrest in these countries which surrounded a type of Christian heretic, called the "New Christian". Basically, these were Jews. They were parading around as Christians but infiltrating the church and attempting to subvert the church with the typical moral subversions we've seen throughout history.

The Inquisition was established literally to combat this growth of insurgency into the church by "heretics". So it is highly likely that witches - in this era - were meant to depict Jews, and these depictions were what persisted through the intervening centuries to give us what we have today. Is it a coincidence that the most popular witch of the last century (Wicked Witch) looks so strikingly Jewish?The focus on women is a whole other post. It is likely that the modern portrayal of witches was heavily influenced by Jews. The idea of a witch, in general, is older than that. But Jews certainly influenced them. Again, witches became a form of propaganda that influenced history. Most monsters don't have that to say.

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[–] kneo24 [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I appreciate the insight. I've definitely learned a little more since starting this thread.

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[–] zyklon_b 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Damn dude wtf i aint gonna read all that shit!!