[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Rocky77 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

I agree fully with this. I've also had some cases of depression and it really helps when you have a purpose or goal to look forward to most days. The more you don't interact with people or do things, the more worthless and horrible you feel for doing nothing. Forcing myself to improve through activities and interactions with people made me a lot happier.

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[–] Lenor ago 

Workout

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[–] sleevey ago  (edited ago)

Ultimately through meditation, but initially through exercise, especially very long hikes through nature.

I used to use exercise because I didn't have any other way of dealing with it so I would basically hike, ride or run until I started to feel better, often I would have to disappear for a few days into the bush to get over whatever was dragging me down. It didn't solve the problem though, it was more of a coping mechanism that worked as long as I was pretty strict with myself, keeping good schedules, watching what I ate etc.

My forays into nature started to evolve into a kind of attempt to get into elevated states of consciousness, at first with some chemical enhancements… although I realised that long term that was a method that would end up degrading my experiences so I stopped doing that pretty quickly. My camping trips started getting longer and longer until I eventually moved to a small cabin in the mountains where I could pay full attention to the flows and patterns of nature, emptying myself and just fully opening up to the grandeur of creation.

This was a very deep time for me, I felt very alive, glowingly healthy and at one with the silent vastness of the universe. But unfortunately it wasn't really a sustainable situation, or if it was I was under a lot of pressure from my family and other people I knew to return to a 'normal' life. I have to admit it was also a very lonely existence. I only had a little dog for company and although I didn't think about it much I would definitely feel very sad when I came into town to get supplies and I'd see people who had been hiking in the area with their friends standing around talking and laughing. I felt like I was invisible to the human world.

So I transitioned back to 'real' life but I knew that I needed a something that would give me what I had found up in the mountains. I tried a few meditation techniques, went to stay in a buddhist monastery to learn from the lamas etc. but never really found anything that delivered until I stumbled across a technique called 'Sahaja Yoga' at a music festival. At first I thought it was just another same ol' thing but I the guy who was showing me was pretty strict and he basically said 'don't waste my time, sit down and practice every day or don't bother coming back'…. so I did. Basically it took me about a week or two until I started going into extremely deep meditations every day and I was pretty happy with just doing that for quite a while.

Eventually though when you meditate it starts to become clear what your problems are and what you have to deal with. Not in a psychoanalysis 'my mother didn't love me' type of way but in that you start to perceive the problems directly as knots and constrictions in your body…. or at least that's the best way I can describe them here. It's not strictly accurate but I would have to go into too much of a tangent to explain it properly and this comment already way longer than I was planning.

Sooo, anyway, through working out these problems I began to see what depression was, how it manifested in my body and how to get rid of it. I realised that it was actually something that was separate from 'me' and in that realisation it loses a lot of it's impact and becomes like a technical problem to be dealt with. I could go into the technicalities of what it is and how to treat it but I think it would be largely meaningless to anyone who isn't practicing this type of meditation. But that's how I did it, and still do sometimes but not very often any more (the depression bit, I still meditate every day.)

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[–] Nothanksplease ago 

The first step (which seems obvious but absolutely is not at the time) is to realize that depression is a very real condition and it's not that you're a worthless pieces of shit that doesn't deserve to be happy like your brain keeps trying to point out to you. Once you realize that, you can start to really working at being happier and breaking self destructive tendencies and cycles.

Like pretty much everyone else mentioned, working out absolutely helps. It gives you something that you need to do each day and the feeling of accomplishment for actually following through is a huge boost. It lets you see yourself progress over time in a quantifiable way and just feeling your body get stronger is an empowering thing.

I used that to build off of. Started making myself go out more, tried to get more connected with my friends and eventually got up the courage to ask a doctor for help. I don't think medication is for everyone but it helps me. If you do decide to go that route, don't just stick with the first thing your Dr gives you. Different medications have different effects on people, it might take a few tries to get one that works for you. Or you might decide that you don't like/need it.

Basically, I think just the act of attempting to get better, no matter which way you try, can let you start to climb out. Then you need to find out what you need to do in your life to be happier.

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[–] beetusvoater ago  (edited ago)

My depression was not diagnosed by a doctor, but based on the contrast to my "usual self" and my behavior in that time period - and the readily available information on the illness - I would assert that I suffered from depression. In my case the cure was threefold: I "diagnosed" (I Know this is bullshit, hence the quotes) myself with Hypothyroidism (I'm not overweight, the overlap of symptoms with the depression was just too big), went to the doctor who confirmed my suspicion. I have to take my medication daily and the dose is quite high... And the effect was overwhelming. All of my symptoms where alleviated and I found the strength to get back into sports (powerlifting/olympic weightlifting), regained my sex drive (which was non-resistant for a few years) and found my SO who gives me further strength. I don't like the idea that I depend on the medication, but my body is dysfunctional that way for unknown reasons, so that's all I can do (It's not caused by autoimmune problems, supposedly). Unless I want to ditch it and face the consequences again... But the high dose of my medicine is testimony of the silliness of such an idea. The biggest obstacle I face in the process was to recognize that I had a real problem and had to do something, asap. That wasn't that easy having just moved out for university and thus being complete on your own. Good luck! Edit: My post may be rough to read. I'm sorry, English isn't my first language.

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[–] ILikeBrownPants ago 

I've never had severe depression, but I was depressed for a few years and at times felt suicidal. I used to spend a lot of time dwelling on negative thoughts especially imagining scenarios that would cause me pain (not physical pain) and one day as I was doing this I realised I was the one hurting myself with my thoughts and decided to stop doing that, it was a revelation. So slowly I managed to stop myself my making myself feel like shit by becoming aware of when I was doing this and telling myself to stop or distracting myself from thinking what I was thinking - and really none of the stuff I imagined ever happened anyway, so I had to stop being my own worst enemy. It takes a while to get out of the habit but very worth it.

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[–] T4yB4cK ago  (edited ago)

I wouldn't say it was severe as I thought about suicide a bit but never actually went through with anything. If anything I was just tired and moody all the time with some emotional problems mixed in due to a couple family/friend/girlfriend problems.

I'm still not entirely sure how I got out of it, but for the most part, I just stopped giving a shit about a lot of things. I stopped putting such emotional investment into things and people. Stopped caring what they think of me and stopped looking for approval from nearly everyone. I started doing what I wanted, what made me happy, and started thinking for myself rather than focusing on what other people wanted me to do.

I also re-evaluated some of my beliefs. I was fairly religious before (not super religious; like I believed in evolution, but just that it was God's instrument) but now consider myself athiest, or at least a little agnostic. Also, I used to be an extremely left wing liberal in terms of social and political views, but have become more moderate as the years have progressed.

Also, I think a big part of how I felt was caused by the sleep issues I used to have. I used to be lucky if I got 2-3 hours of sleep a night. I would go to bed at a normal time, like 9-10, but I would lie awake in my bed until 4-5 in the morning (still no idea if it was insomnia or something like that or just anxiety). I missed a lot of school and was late to work a lot because of this. I finally went to the doctor about it and he suggested that in combination with a little more exercise, some Benadryl could help me fall asleep. Since then, I have had nearly 0 issues with my sleep schedule and have felt immensely better both physically and mentally because of it.

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[–] makesyoumoist ago 

Yoga and meditation are free to all and help better than drugs. Been depressed for 20 years and that is the truth.

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