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[–] ANGRY_Hippopotamus 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

Native Spanish speaker here. Yes it is. Some of us speak faster than others.

I've been told plenty of times I speak too fast, specially in English. Problem being, Spanish is kind of information-sparse meaning we must use far more words than say, English speakers to say the same thing. We tend to bring our speech pace to other languages which is bad.

Having said that, some dialects in my own native country (Venezuela) are fast even for me.

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

No se. Sí tu vocabulario es suficientemente expandido, uno no necesariamente tiene ése problema cuando está tratando de hablar concisamente.

(for reference/comparison):

I don't know. If your vocabulary is sufficiently large enough, one doesn't necessarily have this problem when attempting to speak concisely.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] ANGRY_Hippopotamus ago 

My favourite example is found on ATMs

Insert card as shown -> Inserte la tarjeta como se muestra

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[–] moremetalguitar ago 

Spanish spelling is simpler so the two paragraphs look the same length. But the Spanish one has 50 syllables; the English one has under 40.

So if you said both of them in the same number of seconds, the Spanish would sound faster.

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[–] DickHertz ago  (edited ago)

You could also rephrase the second clause " you won't a problem speaking concisely." You could also you could drop the 'I don't know'.

Man you're a wordy fuck :)

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[–] SilverBanana 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Every language speaks about the same pace. But the pace is measured by sentences, not syllables! Spanish needs more syllables for a sentence, so they "speak faster." Opposite is true e.g. for Finnish. So Finnish will sound sluggish to your ears.

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[–] Chiefpacman [S] 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Makes sense

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[–] FriedFood100 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yeah. When I was trying to learn Spanish, I thought I was doing pretty good until I listened to them speak naturally/casually on television and what not. Forget that, as if learning their ridiculous verb conjugations and noun genders wasn't enough already :P

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[–] NoRagrets ago 

Oo, ShowerThought, how do SJWs reconcile the overuse of noun genders in spanish?

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[–] CaesarAugustus 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

By saying both genders one after the other. Its painful to hear, because both in practice and in the written rules of spanish the male gender is assumed to stand for both, e.g. the congressmen stands for both -men + -women, but a politician will say "the -men and the -women".

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[–] CobraStallone 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Do people in spanish speaking countries ever tell each other to slow down?

People tell me I talk too fast. So yeah, but I'm part of the problem.

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[–] Super_Cooper 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm learning Spanish now and I'm about 40% fluent according to Duolingo. That being said, I have a hard time understanding spoken Spanish due to the speed.

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[–] 30dB 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

I think immersion is key. When I meet with someone new to the US who is struggling to learn English the first thing I tell them is to switch all the Spanish media you consume to English (that means news, music, idle internet browsing, etc.); and, ask friends and family that are fluent to speak to you in English. It helps them adapt faster and learn better. The same can be said of a native English speaker trying to learn Spanish or any other language. Immerse yourself and if possible spend several weeks in country.

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[–] Texan_Pride 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

they also blow through words like they ain't shit. if you miss the enunciation it is undecipherable. Example

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[–] DoomMantia 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Oh yes, and it can get much worse than Mexican Spanish (which is probably the one Americans are more acquainted with). I should know, I'm from Argentina. Our dialect of Spanish, called Rioplatense Spanish, is probably the weirdest variety of this language. To give you an idea, think about the differences between General American English and Scottish or Jamaican English. Then add our use of a different pronoun for the second person singular (vos, instead of the much more common ) with its own unique conjugation. Third, add the vocabulary taken from our lunfardo. Finally, add the speed. The result is you're gonna have a bad time trying to understand us.

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

It just sounds fast to you, but it's actually at a pretty regular pace (not much different than English). I think it's the higher density of hard consonants and shorter syllables that makes it sound like lots of short words, being spoken quickly.

Japanese and Chinese have the same thing going on.

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